Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
Stories By

Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, D.C.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Investors Rattled As President Trump's Trade War Heats Up Again

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/784553336/784553337" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Brazil, Argentina Now On Receiving End Of Trump Tariffs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/784092250/784105484" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dan Digre, who owns a Minnesota factory, Misco, that makes speakers, says tariffs are hurting his ability to compete. Courtesy of Michael Everett/Misco hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Michael Everett/Misco

His Company Makes Speakers. Now He's Speaking Out, Opposing Tariffs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/783359225/784063274" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Trump Signs Bill In Support Of Pro-Democracy Demonstrators In Hong Kong

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/783507923/783508472" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

It's unclear whether President Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping can come to a trade deal. A new bill supporting Hong Kong protesters could complicate talks. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump Waffles On Hong Kong Democracy Bill Amid China Trade Talks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/781972199/782130934" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Low Mobility Rate Has Consequences For Families And The Economy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/781930048/781933139" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Fed Chair Says The Bank Takes Its Cues From Economic Data, Not Criticism From Trump

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/781358747/781358752" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In a speech at the Economic Club of New York on Tuesday, President Trump said a mini trade agreement with China could happen "soon," but he offered no guarantees. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/AP

Trump Makes No Promises On China Trade Deal

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/778517074/778632625" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. And China Agree To Roll Back Some Tariffs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/777352757/777352758" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

What A Tentative Trade Deal Between China And 14 Other Countries Means For The U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/776173349/776173350" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Employers Added 128,000 Jobs In October

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/775509394/775509395" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Workers assemble engines along the line at a General Motors plant in Spring Hill, Tenn. A nationwide strike by the United Automobile Workers at GM plants didn't hurt U.S. job growth in October. Harrison McClary/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Harrison McClary/Reuters

Job Market Resilient In October Despite GM Strike, Beating Expectations

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/775121995/775350024" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

With Wednesday's move, the Federal Reserve, led by Chairman Jerome Powell, has cut interest rates three times so far this year. Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

Fed Cuts Rates Again To Boost A Slowing Economy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/774700678/774850978" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript