Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
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Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, D.C.

Story Archive

Wednesday

The actual state of the economy, after conflicting reports in last night's speeches

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Saturday

In January, the unemployment rate fell to its lowest in over 53 years

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Friday

January saw the strongest job gains since last summer

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A 'help wanted' sign is displayed in a window of a store in Manhattan, New York City, on Dec. 2, 2022. U.S. employers added an unexpectedly strong 517,000 jobs in January, showcasing the labor market is red-hot. The unemployment rate fell to its lowest level in more than half a century. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Economic forecasters think hiring slowed a little bit in January

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Wednesday

Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell speaks during a news conference after the Fed's meeting on Nov. 2, 2022, in Washington, D.C. The Fed raised interest rates by a quarter percentage point on Wednesday, its smallest increase in 11 months. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

The Fed raises interest rates by only a quarter point after inflation drops

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Inflation is coming down but the Fed isn't about to declare victory just yet

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Monday

Thursday

Slower economic growth is expected this year

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Women carry shopping bags as customers visit the American Mall dream mall during Black Friday on Nov. 25, 2022 in East Rutherford, N.J. The U.S. economy ended 2022 on a strong note, but fears of a recession are growing. Kena Betancur/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/Getty Images

The U.S. economy did well in 2022, however, recession fears are growing

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Wednesday

The politics and economics of a potentially costly showdown over the debt ceiling

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Saturday

U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen listens to President Biden discuss the federal debt limit on Oct. 6, 2021, in Washington, D.C. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Close to hitting the debt ceiling, the government must win over House Republicans

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Thursday

It's a complicated picture when you look at the latest inflation numbers

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