Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
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Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, D.C.

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Story Archive

How Pandemic Responses Are Shaping The Economic Recovery Of 3 Continents

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KENA BETANCUR/AFP via Getty Images

After The Banks Leave

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The Economy May Be On The Mend As Retail Sales Soar And Unemployment Claims Fall

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Diners eat lunch at Max's Oyster Bar in West Hartford, Conn., on March 19. Retail sales surged last month as $1,400 relief payments and easing coronavirus restrictions led shoppers to open their wallets. Jessica Hill/AP hide caption

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Jessica Hill/AP

Signs Of Economic Boom Emerge As Retail Sales Surge, Jobless Claims Hit Pandemic Low

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Consumer prices jumped in March, marking a return of inflation, but the Federal Reserve insists any uptick will be temporary. Bruce Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

Consumer Prices Jumped. Should You Worry? That's Sparking A Heated Debate

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The International Monetary Fund has raised its forecasts for both the U.S. and the global economies, crediting rapid COVID-19 vaccine rollouts and relief efforts. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen listens during a meeting with President Biden in the White House on March 5. Yellen on Monday proposed a minimum global tax rate for corporations. Al Drago/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Pool/Getty Images

Janet Yellen Proposes Bold Idea: The Same Minimum Corporate Tax Around The World

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Labor Department Reports U.S. Job Market Improvements In March

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A store in Miami displays a "We are hiring" sign on March 5. U.S. employers added 916,000 jobs in March, the biggest number since August, amid an improving pandemic outlook and trillions of dollars in stimulus passed by Congress. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Roaring Back: Employers Add 916,000 Jobs As Economy Emerges From Winter Slump

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Where Will The Money Come From To Pay For Biden Infrastructure Plan?

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Electrical power line towers are seen in Los Angeles in August. Overdue power bills have mushroomed during the pandemic as job losses mounted and power consumption soared. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

'Fiasco Waiting To Happen': Millions At Risk Of Losing Power Over Unpaid Bills

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Millions At Risk As States Begin To Lift Power Shut-Off Bans

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A "Retail Space Available" sign is displayed in the window of a closed JPMorgan Chase & Co. branch in the Bronx borough of New York City on Feb. 22, 2019. Banks have been closing branches, a trend that has accelerated during the pandemic as more people manage their accounts online. Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images

'What Are We Going To Do?': Towns Reel As Banks Close Branches At Record Pace

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