Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
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Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, DC, with his dog, Rosie.

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Story Archive

Peter Navarro, White House director of trade and manufacturing policy, has admitted quoting a fictional character in several of his nonfiction books. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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White House Adviser Peter Navarro Calls Fictional Alter Ego An 'Inside Joke'

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Democratic Candidates Tackle Issue Of Income Inequality In 4th Debate

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Esther Duflo of France waves after receiving the Princess of Asturias award for Social Sciences from Spain's King Felipe VI at a ceremony in Oviedo, northern Spain. She is only the second woman to win the 2019 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences, sharing it with Abhijit Banarjee and Michael Kremer. Jose Vicente/AP hide caption

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Jose Vicente/AP

3 Win Nobel Prize In Economics For Work In Reducing Poverty

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Nobel Prize For Economics Awarded To 3 For Work Fighting Global Poverty

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U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He in the Oval Office at the White House October 11, 2019 in Washington, DC. President Trump announced a 'phase one' partial trade deal with China. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Analysts Doubt This Week's Trade Talks With China Will Be Successful

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A new rule proposed by the Labor Department would allow employers to require waitstaff and others to share their tips with kitchen staff. But labor advocates say it could allow bosses to take advantage of their workers. studiocasper/Getty Images hide caption

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New Jobs Holds Steady As Growth Slows

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A worker assembles an industrial valve at Emerson Electric Co.'s factory in Marshalltown, Iowa. The manufacturing sector has seen a slowdown amid the ongoing trade war. Tim Aeppel/Reuters hide caption

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Tim Aeppel/Reuters

Hiring Steady As Employers Add 136,000 Jobs; Unemployment Dips To 3.5%

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Why The Prices Of Irish Butter, Scotch Whisky, Other European Goods Are Going Up

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President Trump signed a partial trade agreement along with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in New York, where the two leaders are attending the United Nations General Assembly. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

With a growing number of imports from China facing tariffs, some companies are trying to avoid those costs by falsely labeling Chinese products as manufactured elsewhere. YinYang/Getty Images hide caption

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A Mysterious Pencil Factory Sharpens Focus On Tariff Scams

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UAW's Strike Against GM Brings To Mind Last Century's Labor Battles

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