Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
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Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, D.C.

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Story Archive

Spike In Coronavirus Cases Slows Job Growth

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A person cleans a table in an outdoor tented dining area of a restaurant in Sacramento, Calif., on Nov. 19. Job growth slowed sharply in November as relief aid is due to expire at the end of the year. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

'Warning Signs Flashing': Job Growth Slows Sharply As Pandemic Takes Toll On Economy

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Patio tables are empty at a diner this week in West Hollywood, Calif., after Los Angeles County banned outdoor dining amid the pandemic. The struggles of restaurants and retailers are expected to have led to sharply slower job growth last month. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Coronavirus Relief To End If Congress Can't Pass A Deal

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Sen. Mark Warner speaks alongside a bipartisan group of lawmakers as they announce a proposal for a $908 billion coronavirus relief bill on Tuesday. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Millions Face Bitter Winter If Congress Fails To Extend Relief Programs

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Capitol Hill Lawmakers Consider Additional Pandemic Aid

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With Relief Programs Expiring Soon, Millions Of Americans Expect A Difficult Winter

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Biden Nominates More Members Of His Economic Team

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A protester holds a sign to protest measures in Miami to close indoor seating amid a rise in coronavirus cases. The number of unemployment claims rose for a second week, reinforcing concerns about the economy. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Historic Milestone: Dow Surges Past 30,000 Points For 1st Time

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Trump Pushes Through Policy Changes And Staffing Appointments In Last Days In Office

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Yellen Reportedly Tapped To Become Treasury Secretary

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Then-Federal Reserve Board Chair Janet Yellen speaks during a briefing in 2017. President-elect Joe Biden reportedly will nominate Yellen as his Treasury secretary. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Biden Picks Janet Yellen To Be Treasury Secretary In Historic Appointment

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Judy Shelton testifies before the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee during a February hearing on her nomination to the Federal Reserve's board of governors. A slim majority in the Senate is expected to confirm Shelton this week. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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