Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
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Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, D.C.

Story Archive

Wednesday

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Tuesday

Two major credit card companies, Capital One and Discover Financial, may join forces

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Tuesday

Inflation in January was higher than forecasted

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The Labor Department lays out last month's cost of living stats

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Saturday

Your guide to a pocket-friendly Super Bowl tailgate

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Friday

Chicken wing prices have fallen for the second year in a row, in a windfall for Super Bowl snackers. Beef prices, however, are still climbing. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Good thing, wings cost less and beer's flat: Super Bowl fans are expected to splurge

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Friday

A construction worker is seen in Miami on Jan. 5, 2024. U.S. employers added more jobs than expected in January including in the construction sector. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The U.S. created an extraordinary number of jobs in January. Here's a deeper look

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U.S. employers added a whopping 353,000 jobs in January — far more than expected

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Wednesday

Fed Chair Jerome Powell speaks during a news conference after the concludion of the Fed's policy meeting in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 20, 2023. The Fed held interest rates steady on Wednesday but indicated it could cut rates this year while also noting it would move cautiously. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Federal Reserve holds interest rates steady but signals rate cuts may be coming

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Experts urge caution when it comes to the Federal Reserve lowering interest rates

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Sunday

The Greyhound bus station in Richmond, Va., sits on prime real estate. Developers now plan to raze it and build apartment towers and retail space. It's one of many bus stations being shut down. Scott Horsley hide caption

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Scott Horsley

Greyhound stations were once a big part of America. Now, many of them are being shut

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Thursday

A person carries shopping bags at a shopping center on the day after Christmas on Dec. 26, 2023 in Glendale, Calif. Strong consumer spending helped drive better-than-expected economic growth in the final months of 2023. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Many experts feared a recession. Instead, the economy has continued to soar

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Monday

Bus stations around the country are closing, leaving waiting riders without shelter

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Saturday

Public sentiment about the economy is looking up, polls show

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Wednesday

Tuesday

Thursday

Rent costs are leveling off and even dropping around the U.S.

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Americans are feeling a little bit better about inflation as gasoline prices fall

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Friday

U.S. employers surpass forecasters' predictions by adding 216,000 jobs in December

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The U.S. job market held up well in 2023, despite rising interest rates. Employers added 2.7 million jobs last year and unemployment remained under 4% throughout the year. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Was it a strong finish to the 2023 job market? The Labor Department has an answer

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Monday

Attitudes about the economy are much better than they were this time last year

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