Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
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Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, D.C.

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Story Archive

Shipping containers are stacked high at the Port of Los Angeles in April. Supply chain disruptions are hitting small-business owners across the United States. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Cargo Is Piling Up Everywhere, And It's Making Inflation Worse

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Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell testifies at a House Financial Services Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in December. The Fed said on Wednesday it will continue providing support to the economy despite the rise in consumer prices. Jim Lo Scalzo/Pool via AP hide caption

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Jim Lo Scalzo/Pool via AP

Federal Reserve Will Continue Supporting The Economy Despite Surging Prices

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U.S. And E.U. Suspend Boeing-Airbus Dispute To Counter China

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Republican Governors In 25 States End Jobless Aid Early

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GOP Senators Move To End Pandemic Unemployment Benefits Early

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Inflation Climbs Even Higher With Prices Rising 5% In May

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Used cars sit on the sales lot at Frank Bent's Wholesale Motors in El Cerrito, Calif., on March 15. Supply chain snarls and pent-up demand are driving up the prices of a lot of things, including new and used cars. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Inflation Is Surging. The Price Of A Toyota Pickup Truck Helps Explain Why

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Labor Department Keeps Watch On Inflation With Consumer Price Index

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Inflation Has Surged From The Pandemic Recession — But That Isn't Stopping Buyers

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G7 Nations Are Taking A Major Step Toward Global Tax Reform

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A pedestrian walks by a "Now Hiring" sign outside of a Lamps Plus store in San Francisco on on June 3. Four states, including Mississippi, are moving to end an extra $300-a-week unemployment benefit, arguing the pay is discouraging people from finding work. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Employers Added 559,000 Jobs In May

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Labor Department Releases Job Numbers For May

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Pandemic Unemployment Benefits Are Ending Early In Over 2 Dozen States

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