Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
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Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, D.C.

Story Archive

The Fed's latest interest rate hike has some congressional lawmakers worried

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Jerome Powell, Chairman, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System testifies before the Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee on June 22, 2022 in Washington, DC. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Powell says recession 'a possibility' but not likely

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Fed chairman will testify before a pair of Congressional committees this week

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Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell looks on after taking the oath of office for his second term at the helm of the central bank at the Fed's headquarters in Washington, D.C., on May 23. The Fed raised interest rates by three-quarters of a percentage point on Wednesday. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

The Fed delivers biggest interest rate hike in decades to combat surging inflation

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The Fed is expected to raise interest rates to get a grip on rising inflation

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A customer shops at a grocery store in San Rafael, Calif., on June 8. Inflation has surged to its highest rate in nearly 40 years, and Americans are having to adjust some of their spending patterns. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Inflation soars to an over 40-year high. These are the ways Americans are coping

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Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen faces judgement over inflation

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Factories have boosted production, but baby formula is likely to stay in short supply

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The job market was strong in May, but is still overshadowed by high inflation

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A 'now hiring' sign is displayed outside of a Burlington Coat Factory retail store in downtown Los Angeles on March 11. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

The job market stays red-hot with the unemployment rate near a pre-pandemic low

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In this economy, it's a good time to be looking for work

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The baby-formula shortage has led some to question why the U.S. doesn't provide more support for breastfeeding. Here, a woman breastfeeds her son outside New York City Hall during a 2014 rally to support breastfeeding in public. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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The baby formula shortage is prompting calls to increase support for breastfeeding

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