Geoff Brumfiel Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk.
Geoff Brumfiel, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
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Geoff Brumfiel

Mike Morgan/NPR
Geoff Brumfiel, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Geoff Brumfiel

Senior Editor and Correspondent

Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk. His editing duties include science and space, while his reporting focuses on the intersection of science and national security.

From April of 2016 to September of 2018, Brumfiel served as an editor overseeing basic research and climate science. Prior to that, he worked for three years as a reporter covering physics and space for the network. Brumfiel has carried his microphone into ghost villages created by the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan. He's tracked the journey of highly enriched uranium as it was shipped out of Poland. For a story on how animals drink, he crouched for over an hour and tried to convince his neighbor's cat to lap a bowl of milk.

Before NPR, Brumfiel was based in London as a senior reporter for Nature Magazine from 2007-2013. There, he covered energy, space, climate, and the physical sciences. From 2002 – 2007, Brumfiel was Nature Magazine's Washington Correspondent.

Brumfiel is the 2013 winner of the Association of British Science Writers award for news reporting on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

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Solid research has found the vaccines authorized for use against COVID-19 to be safe and effective. But some anti-vaccine activists are mischaracterizing government data to imply the jabs are dangerous. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP

Anti-Vaccine Activists Use A Federal Database To Spread Fear About COVID Vaccines

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Jeff Bezos' Space Trek Could Usher In New Era Of Space Tourism

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Half of all the adults in the US have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. Each person vaccinated helps fight the pandemic's spread. Noam Galai/Getty Images hide caption

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Noam Galai/Getty Images

President Biden directed the intelligence agencies to look for evidence of an accident at the Wuhan Institute of Virology (pictured). Many scientists still think its more likely the virus came form the wild. Hector Retamal /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal /AFP via Getty Images

Many Scientists Still Think The Coronavirus Came From Nature

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Pandemic Likely Began With Animals, But US Intel Agencies Will Investigate

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U.S. Officials Press For Deeper Coronavirus Origins Investigation

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People line up for COVID-19 vaccinations last month in Hagerstown, Md. Each person vaccinated helps end the pandemic, epidemiologists say, and helps lower the rate of hospitalization and death from COVID-19. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

It's Time For America's Fixation On Herd Immunity To End, Scientists Say

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Scientists Say It's Time For America To End Fixation On Herd Immunity

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Anti-vaccine advocates are using the COVID-19 pandemic to promote books, supplementals and services. Emilija Manevska/Getty Images hide caption

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Emilija Manevska/Getty Images

For Some Anti-Vaccine Advocates, Misinformation Is Part Of A Business

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New Tiny Computers Could Have A Huge Impact

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Wildlife has moved into deserted towns in Fukushima prefecture, after people evacuated due to the nuclear accident a decade ago. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Nearly a third of adults in the U.S. have gotten at least one shot of the COVID-19 vaccine so far, but researchers warn that vaccine refusal may keep the country from reaching herd immunity. John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Vaccine Refusal May Put Herd Immunity At Risk, Researchers Warn

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Herd Immunity Is At Risk If Many People In U.S. Say 'No' To Vaccine

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Google is one of the companies investing in building quantum computers. Google hide caption

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Google

Is The Future Quantum?

NPR science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel takes us to IonQ, one of the companies betting on a quantum computing future. Along the way, Geoff explains what little researchers know about how we might actually use this technology. There are hints though quantum computing could change everything from discovering new drugs to developing advanced materials.

Is The Future Quantum?

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