Geoff Brumfiel Science editor Geoff Brumfiel oversees coverage of everything from butterflies to black holes across NPR News programs and on NPR.org.

Geoff Brumfiel

Science Editor

Science editor Geoff Brumfiel oversees coverage of everything from butterflies to black holes across NPR News programs and on NPR.org.

Prior to becoming the editor for fundamental research news in April of 2016, Brumfiel worked for three years as a reporter covering physics and space. Brumfiel has carried his microphone into ghost villages created by the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan. He's tracked the journey of highly enriched uranium as it was shipped out of Poland. For a story on how animals drink, he crouched for over an hour and tried to convince his neighbor's cat to lap a bowl of milk.

Before NPR, Brumfiel was based in London as a senior reporter for Nature Magazine from 2007-2013. There he covered energy, space, climate, and the physical sciences. In addition to reporting, he was a member of the award-winning Nature podcast team. From 2002 – 2007, Brumfiel was Nature Magazine's Washington Correspondent, reporting on Congress, the Bush administration, NASA, and the National Science Foundation, as well as the Departments of Energy and Defense.

He began his journalism career working on the American Physical Society's "Focus" website, which is now part of Physics.

Brumfiel is the 2013 winner of the Association of British Science Writers award for news reporting on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

He graduated from Grinnell College with a BA double degree in physics and English, and earned his Masters in science writing from Johns Hopkins University.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

The Air Force currently oversees many of the military's space activities, such as the experimental X-37B spacecraft. Michael Stonecypher/USAF hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Stonecypher/USAF

Trump Calls For 'Space Force' To Defend U.S. Interests Among The Stars

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/621127192/621127193" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A satellite photo of the Punggye-ri nuclear test site in North Korea on Wednesday. Digitalglobe hide caption

toggle caption
Digitalglobe

North Korea Demolishes Its Nuclear Test Site In A 'Huge Explosion'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/613465473/613990562" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Military personnel wearing protective suits investigate the poisoning of Sergei Skripal in Salisbury, England. Skripal and his daughter, Yulia, remain critically ill. Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin discussed the new missile during his annual state of the nation address in Moscow on Thursday. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

On March 1, 1954, the U.S. conducted its largest nuclear test with a yield of 15 megatons. The new Russian weapon would be up to 100 megatons, according to reports. USAF Lookout Moutain Laboratory hide caption

toggle caption
USAF Lookout Moutain Laboratory

Buried In Trump's Nuclear Report: A Russian Doomsday Weapon

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/582087310/582852332" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Review Of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Paints A Picture Of A More Dangerous Nuclear World

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578666136/578666173" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

John Coster-Mullen Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

North Korea Designed A Nuke. So Did This Truck Driver

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/570806064/573464391" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript