Geoff Brumfiel Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk.
Geoff Brumfiel, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
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Geoff Brumfiel

Mike Morgan/NPR
Geoff Brumfiel, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Geoff Brumfiel

Senior Editor and Correspondent

Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk. His editing duties include climate and environment, while his reporting focuses on the intersection of science and national security.

From April of 2016 to September of 2018, Brumfiel served as an editor overseeing basic research and climate science. Prior to that, he worked for three years as a reporter covering physics and space for the network. Brumfiel has carried his microphone into ghost villages created by the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan. He's tracked the journey of highly enriched uranium as it was shipped out of Poland. For a story on how animals drink, he crouched for over an hour and tried to convince his neighbor's cat to lap a bowl of milk.

Before NPR, Brumfiel was based in London as a senior reporter for Nature Magazine from 2007-2013. There, he covered energy, space, climate, and the physical sciences. From 2002 – 2007, Brumfiel was Nature Magazine's Washington Correspondent.

Brumfiel is the 2013 winner of the Association of British Science Writers award for news reporting on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

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Second U.S.-North Korea Summit Likely Focus On Nuclear Weapons Center

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These satellite images show a circular launchpad for the Safir rocket at the Imam Khomeini Space Center in Iran. The image on the right, taken on Feb. 6, shows a burn scar. The image on the left, from Jan. 21, does not. Planet Labs Inc. hide caption

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Planet Labs Inc.

Russian troops load a missile onto an Iskander-M launcher during a 2016 exercise. Russia is now deploying missiles to Kaliningrad, its Baltic exclave. Yuri Smityuk/TASS via Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Smityuk/TASS via Getty Images

The U.S. And Russia Are Stocking Up On Missiles And Nukes For A Different Kind Of War

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U.S. Begins Production Of A New Nuclear Weapon

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What's Iran Up To With Recent Rocket Launch Attempt?

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President Trump called for a beefing up of existing defenses, such as the Aegis ashore system pictured. In addition, he called for research into new advanced concepts. Mark Wright/Missile Defense Agency hide caption

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Mark Wright/Missile Defense Agency

Trump Unveils Ambitious Missile Defense Plans

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Iran's Simorgh rocket pictured before an attempted satellite launch in 2017. Experts say the rocket's second stage is too small to be used as a missile. Iranian Defense Ministry via AP hide caption

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Iranian Defense Ministry via AP

As the economy boomed, emissions rose sharply in 2018. Shipping was one source of the increase. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions Are Once Again On The Rise

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A jet lands at London Gatwick Airport on Friday. The airport had been closed for over a day after a drone repeatedly flew nearby. Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images

How To Stop A Drone? There's No Good Answer

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North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at a celebration for scientists and engineers who contributed to the nation's latest nuclear test. KCNA /Reuters hide caption

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KCNA /Reuters

Open Scientific Collaboration May Be Helping North Korea Cheat Nuclear Sanctions

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Satellite images reveal tunneling and other construction activity at two sites believed to house long-range missiles. D Schmerler/MIIS/PlanetLabs hide caption

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D Schmerler/MIIS/PlanetLabs

North Korea Seen Expanding Missile Base

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President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un signed a declaration in June, but the vague language may be hampering further negotiations. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

North Korea Denuclearization Plan Has Gone Nowhere Since Trump-Kim Summit

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