Geoff Brumfiel Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk.
Geoff Brumfiel, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
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Geoff Brumfiel

Mike Morgan/NPR
Geoff Brumfiel, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Geoff Brumfiel

Senior Editor and Correspondent

Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk. His editing duties include climate and environment, while his reporting focuses on the intersection of science and national security.

From April of 2016 to September of 2018, Brumfiel served as an editor overseeing basic research and climate science. Prior to that, he worked for three years as a reporter covering physics and space for the network. Brumfiel has carried his microphone into ghost villages created by the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan. He's tracked the journey of highly enriched uranium as it was shipped out of Poland. For a story on how animals drink, he crouched for over an hour and tried to convince his neighbor's cat to lap a bowl of milk.

Before NPR, Brumfiel was based in London as a senior reporter for Nature Magazine from 2007-2013. There, he covered energy, space, climate, and the physical sciences. From 2002 – 2007, Brumfiel was Nature Magazine's Washington Correspondent.

Brumfiel is the 2013 winner of the Association of British Science Writers award for news reporting on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

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Why So Many Countries Have Their Sights Set On Visiting The Moon

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An Iranian security official in protective clothing walks through a uranium conversion facility in 2005. Iran says it is now enriching uranium above the limit set in the 2015 nuclear deal. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

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Vahid Salemi/AP

Iran's Uranium Enrichment Breaks Nuclear Deal Limit. Here's What That Means

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Iran Says It Has Exceeded Uranium Limits Set In 2015 Nuclear Deal

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International Efforts To Curb Iran's Nuclear Ambition Take Another Hit

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A file photo from Jan. 15, 2011, shows Iran's heavy water nuclear facility near Arak. Iran plans to walk back modifications to a nuclear reactor at the site. Hamid Foroutan/AP hide caption

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Hamid Foroutan/AP

Iran Is About To Exceed Uranium Limits. Is The Nuclear Deal Dying?

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Iran Announces It Will Soon Exceed Limits Of Uranium Agreed To In 2015 Nuclear Deal

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A Falcon 9 rocket carried 60 satellites for SpaceX's Starlink broadband network into space last month. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

Astronomers Worry That Elon Musk's New Satellites Will Ruin The View

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Iranian soldiers carry part of a target drone used in air-defense exercises. Iran is also turning some target drones into low-tech weapons for its proxies. Iranian Army via AP hide caption

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Iranian Army via AP

In Yemen Conflict, Some See A New Age Of Drone Warfare

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Iran Announces It Will Ramp Up Nuclear Activities

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Satellite imagery from the company Planet shows construction of a small research reactor at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology in Riyadh. Planet Labs Inc hide caption

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Planet Labs Inc

As Saudi Arabia Builds A Nuclear Reactor, Some Worry About Its Motives

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The Jasons, a group of scientists who advise the U.S. government, have developed technologies such as a laser that can help reduce atmospheric distortion. The Air Force uses it to better photograph passing spy satellites. R. Fugate/Air Force Research Laboratory hide caption

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R. Fugate/Air Force Research Laboratory

After Pentagon Ends Contract, Top-Secret Scientists Group Vows To Carry On

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President Trump vowed in January to "detect and destroy any missile launched against the United States anywhere, anytime, anyplace." Doing so would likely mean basing defenses in space. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Trump's Plan To Zap Incoming Missiles With Lasers Is Back To The Future

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