Geoff Brumfiel Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk.
Geoff Brumfiel, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
Stories By

Geoff Brumfiel

Mike Morgan/NPR
Geoff Brumfiel, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Geoff Brumfiel

Senior Editor and Correspondent

Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk. His editing duties include science and space, while his reporting focuses on the intersection of science and national security.

From April of 2016 to September of 2018, Brumfiel served as an editor overseeing basic research and climate science. Prior to that, he worked for three years as a reporter covering physics and space for the network. Brumfiel has carried his microphone into ghost villages created by the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan. He's tracked the journey of highly enriched uranium as it was shipped out of Poland. For a story on how animals drink, he crouched for over an hour and tried to convince his neighbor's cat to lap a bowl of milk.

Before NPR, Brumfiel was based in London as a senior reporter for Nature Magazine from 2007-2013. There, he covered energy, space, climate, and the physical sciences. From 2002 – 2007, Brumfiel was Nature Magazine's Washington Correspondent.

Brumfiel is the 2013 winner of the Association of British Science Writers award for news reporting on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Satellite Images Reveal Damage At Iranian Nuclear Facility

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/889340127/889342743" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bug Hunt: Bumblebee Millipede That Could Be A Pet

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/888510075/888510076" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Predators That Walk On Water: Some Facts To Know About Water Skaters

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/887128834/887128835" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A SpaceX Falcon 9, with NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken in the Dragon crew capsule, lifts off from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., on Saturday. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David J. Phillip/AP

NASA And SpaceX Launch 1st Astronauts To Orbit From U.S. Since 2011

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/864514995/866119796" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Clouds pass over the SpaceX Falcon 9, with the Crew Dragon spacecraft on top of the rocket on Launch Pad 39-A on Wednesday at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David J. Phillip/AP

Two astronauts will launch to the International Space Station aboard a new capsule built by the company SpaceX. SpaceX hide caption

toggle caption
SpaceX

Here's How The Pandemic Is Changing America's Plans For Its Newest Spaceship

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/860170672/861909626" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

World-Wide Travel Restrictions Violate International Health Regulations

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/858236650/858236651" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Donald Trump talks to reporters before boarding Air Force One on May 5. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Evan Vucci/AP

As Trump Pushes Theory Of Virus Origins, Some See Parallels In Lead-Up To Iraq War

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/851043242/851826628" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An aerial view shows the P4 laboratory at the Wuhan Institute of Virology in China. The facility is among a handful of labs around the world cleared to handle Class 4 pathogens (P4) - dangerous viruses that pose a high risk of person-to-person transmission. Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images

The Wuhan Institute of Virology (above) has been the focus of the lab accident theory. Scientists interviewed by NPR said that all evidence points to the pandemic not being the result of a lab accident. Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images

Virus Researchers Cast Doubt On Theory Of Coronavirus Lab Accident

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/841729646/843137324" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scientists Debunk Lab Accident Theory Of Pandemic Emergence

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/841925672/841925673" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Examining Trump's COVID-19 Rhetoric Against Factual Evidence

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/836719931/836719932" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript