Geoff Brumfiel Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk.
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Geoff Brumfiel

Geoff Brumfiel

Senior Editor and Correspondent

Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk. His editing duties include climate and environment, while his reporting focuses on the intersection of science and national security.

From April of 2016 to September of 2018, Brumfiel served as an editor overseeing basic research and climate science. Prior to that, he worked for three years as a reporter covering physics and space for the network. Brumfiel has carried his microphone into ghost villages created by the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan. He's tracked the journey of highly enriched uranium as it was shipped out of Poland. For a story on how animals drink, he crouched for over an hour and tried to convince his neighbor's cat to lap a bowl of milk.

Before NPR, Brumfiel was based in London as a senior reporter for Nature Magazine from 2007-2013. There, he covered energy, space, climate, and the physical sciences. From 2002 – 2007, Brumfiel was Nature Magazine's Washington Correspondent.

Brumfiel is the 2013 winner of the Association of British Science Writers award for news reporting on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

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Satellite images reveal tunneling and other construction activity at two sites believed to house long-range missiles. D Schmerler/MIIS/PlanetLabs hide caption

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D Schmerler/MIIS/PlanetLabs

North Korea Seen Expanding Missile Base

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President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un signed a declaration in June, but the vague language may be hampering further negotiations. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

North Korea Denuclearization Plan Has Gone Nowhere Since Trump-Kim Summit

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An exchange shop displays rates for various currencies in downtown Tehran last month. Iran is bracing for the restoration of U.S. sanctions on its vital oil industry set to take effect on Monday, as it grapples with an economic crisis that has sparked sporadic protests over rising prices, corruption and unemployment. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

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Vahid Salemi/AP

Reimposing Sanctions Will Hasten End Of Iran Nuclear Deal, Some Experts Warn

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The X-51A Waverider was a prototype hypersonic missile capable of flying at Mach 5.1 for hundreds of miles. The Air Force is stepping up its development of similar weapons. Mike Cassidy/U.S. Air Force hide caption

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Mike Cassidy/U.S. Air Force

Nations Rush Ahead With Hypersonic Weapons Amid Arms Race Fear

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U.S. To Pull Out Of International Arms Control Agreement

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Aric Toler is part of Bellingcat, an international Internet research organization that has meticulously investigated conflicts around the world. This week, the online group outed one of two Russian agents believed to have been involved in poisonings in the U.K. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Meet The Internet Researchers Unmasking Russian Assassins

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Marie Curie (left), French physicist and winner of the 1903 Nobel Prize for physics, Canadian Donna Strickland (middle), who won the 2018 prize for her work with lasers, and physicist Maria Goeppert Mayer (right), who won for her work in atomic physics in 1963. Hulton Archive/Stringer/Getty Images, University of Waterloo/The Canadian Press via AP, Bettmann/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Stringer/Getty Images, University of Waterloo/The Canadian Press via AP, Bettmann/Getty Images

The Nobel Prize In Physics: 117 Years, 3 Women And Counting

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3 Scientists Win Nobel Prize In Physics

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New satellite imagery of a remote Russian test site suggests that the missile may not be working as well as claimed. Satellite imagery from Planet Labs Inc. hide caption

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Satellite imagery from Planet Labs Inc.

Russia's Nuclear Cruise Missile Is Struggling To Take Off, Imagery Suggests

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The Sohae Satellite Launching Station was the site of North Korea's first successful space launch in 2012. The North now says it will dismantle the facility. David Guttenfelder/AP hide caption

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David Guttenfelder/AP

Spiez Laboratory is believed to have been involved with the analysis of chemical agents used in the U.K. It was allegedly targeted by Russian agents earlier this year. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images

VP Pence Unveils Plans For New Military Branch In Outer Space

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The Air Force currently oversees many of the military's space activities, such as the experimental X-37B spacecraft. Michael Stonecypher/USAF hide caption

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Michael Stonecypher/USAF

Trump Calls For 'Space Force' To Defend U.S. Interests Among The Stars

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