Geoff Brumfiel Science editor Geoff Brumfiel oversees coverage of everything from butterflies to black holes across NPR News programs and on NPR.org.

In this undated photo provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, a shipment of nuclear waste arrives at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, near Carlsbad, N.M. U.S. Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office/AP hide caption

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U.S. Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office/AP

13 Workers Exposed To Radiation At N.M. Nuclear Waste Dump

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Cat Or Dog? Sure, you can easily tell the difference. But a machine may not be able to guess on the first try. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Deep Learning: Teaching Computers To Tell Things Apart

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U.S. Government To Back Loans For Nuclear Power

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The National Ignition Facility's 192 laser beams focus onto a tiny target. LLNL hide caption

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LLNL

Scientists Say Their Giant Laser Has Produced Nuclear Fusion

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Woolly mammoths depended on tiny flowering plants for protein. Did the decline of the flowers cause their extinction? Per Möller/Johanna Anjar hide caption

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Per Möller/Johanna Anjar

Woolly Mammoths' Taste For Flowers May Have Been Their Undoing

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Assad Regime Slows In Handing Over Chemical Weapons

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An artist's concept of a narrow asteroid belt orbiting a star similar to our own sun. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

Asteroid Belt May Be Just One Big Melting Pot Of Space Rocks

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The Chinese flag is seen in front of a view of the moon at Beijing's Tiananmen Square in December, when China's first moon rover touched the lunar surface. That feat was widely celebrated — but observers believe the rover has now run into serious trouble. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

China's Jade Rabbit Rover May Be Doomed On The Moon

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An unidentified inspector from the International Atomic Energy Agency examines equipment at the Natanz facility in Iran on Monday. Kazem Ghane/AP hide caption

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Kazem Ghane/AP

Nuclear Inspectors Enter Iran, With Eyes Peeled For Cheating

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A flock of Northern bald ibises forms a flying V. Courtesy of Markus Unsöld hide caption

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Courtesy of Markus Unsöld

The Science Behind Flying In V Formation

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This composite image shows new details of the aftermath of a massive star that exploded and was visible from Earth over 1,000 years ago. Chandra X-ray Observatory Center/NASA hide caption

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Chandra X-ray Observatory Center/NASA

Dying Stars Write Their Own Swan Songs

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Can't Stand The Cold Snap? Don't Go To Antarctica

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The National Security Agency headquarters at Fort Meade, Md. The agency has been trying to build a quantum computer, The Washington Post reports — but that news doesn't surprise experts in the field. Saul Loeb/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/Getty Images

The NSA's Quantum Code-Breaking Research Is No Secret

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Never mind holiday stress. Steer clear of black holes, or risk "spaghettification" — or worse. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Stretch Or Splat? How A Black Hole Kills You Matters ... A Lot

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NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy performs a spacewalk in May to inspect and replace a pump controller box on the International Space Station. On Saturday, two astronauts will perform the first in a series of similar spacewalks to fix a broken cooling line on the ISS. AP hide caption

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AP

Astronauts Ready For Marathon Spacewalks

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