Geoff Brumfiel Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk.
Geoff Brumfiel, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
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Geoff Brumfiel

Mike Morgan/NPR
Geoff Brumfiel, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Geoff Brumfiel

Senior Editor and Correspondent

Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk. His editing duties include science and space, while his reporting focuses on the intersection of science and national security.

From April of 2016 to September of 2018, Brumfiel served as an editor overseeing basic research and climate science. Prior to that, he worked for three years as a reporter covering physics and space for the network. Brumfiel has carried his microphone into ghost villages created by the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan. He's tracked the journey of highly enriched uranium as it was shipped out of Poland. For a story on how animals drink, he crouched for over an hour and tried to convince his neighbor's cat to lap a bowl of milk.

Before NPR, Brumfiel was based in London as a senior reporter for Nature Magazine from 2007-2013. There, he covered energy, space, climate, and the physical sciences. From 2002 – 2007, Brumfiel was Nature Magazine's Washington Correspondent.

Brumfiel is the 2013 winner of the Association of British Science Writers award for news reporting on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

Story Archive

Tuesday

Physicist Peter Higgs, whose subatomic particle research changed the world, has died

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Monday

Sunday

Those in the path of totality for the eclipse might have to watch out for traffic

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Friday

RV traffic sits at a standstill along a two-lane road near Madras, Ore., a few days before the 2017 total solar eclipse. Experts say traffic could be heavy, but eclipse watchers shouldn't necessarily be deterred. AFP Contributor/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP Contributor/AFP via Getty Images

Monday

In the solar eclipse's shadow, hundreds of students will launch balloons for NASA

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Student volunteers prepare two balloons for a morning launch in Cumberland, Md., as part of a nationwide project to study the April 8 eclipse. Meredith Rizzo for NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo for NPR

On eclipse day, hundreds of students will send up balloons for science

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Friday

The National Ignition Facility used lasers to generate net energy from a pellet of fusion fuel in 2022. But the experiment is still a long way from truly producing more electricity than it requires. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory hide caption

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Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Are we on the brink of a nuclear fusion breakthrough?

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Thursday

Wednesday

Thursday

Caecilians are amphibians that look superficially like very large earthworms. New research suggests that at least one species of caecilian also produces "milk" for its hatchlings. Photo by Carlos Jared hide caption

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Photo by Carlos Jared

Researchers have found an amphibian that makes milk for its babies

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Wednesday

This artist's concept shows the Voyager 1 spacecraft entering the space between stars. Interstellar space is dominated by plasma, ionized gas (illustrated here as brownish haze). NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

The Voyager 1 spacecraft has a big glitch. Now, NASA must figure out how to fix it

The Voyager 1 space probe is the farthest human-made object in space. It launched in 1977 with a golden record on board that carried assorted sounds of our home planet: greetings in many different languages, dogs barking, and the sound of two people kissing, to name but a few examples. The idea with this record was that someday, Voyager 1 might be our emissary to alien life – an audible time capsule of Earth's beings. Since its launch, it also managed to complete missions to Jupiter and Saturn. In 2012, it crossed into interstellar space.

The Voyager 1 spacecraft has a big glitch. Now, NASA must figure out how to fix it

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Thursday

Keeping up with the first possible U.S. soft moon landing in decades

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The IM-1 Nova-C lander, from Houston-based Intuitive Machines, just became the first private spacecraft to land on the moon in one piece. Intuitive Machines hide caption

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Intuitive Machines

Private lunar lander returns U.S. to the moon 50 years later. Here's what to know

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Tuesday

A Palestinian man walks past an Israeli checkpoint in the city of Hebron in the occupied West Bank on December 24, 2023. Mosab Shawer/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mosab Shawer/AFP via Getty Images

Monday

A member of the Israeli security forces stands guard. An attack against troops was reported near the West Bank city of Hebron on Feb. 1. Many settlers have joined the military's regional defense units since the Oct. 7 attack on Israel by Hamas-backed militants. Hazem Bader/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Hazem Bader/AFP via Getty Images

Israeli settlers are guarding the West Bank. Palestinians say it's worsening violence

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Thursday

A new Russian weapon system for targeting satellites is under development

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An undated photo shows a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying Starlink communications satellites into orbit. The Starlink constellation is made up of thousands of satellites that are difficult for adversaries to target. SpaceX hide caption

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SpaceX

Russia is working on a weapon to destroy satellites but has not deployed one yet

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Saturday

Several nations pause funding to UNRWA over alleged staff involvement in Hamas attack

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Idit (from left), Ronen and Kobi Ohel — mother, brother and father of Alon Ohel — listen to the concert. Tamir Kalifa for NPR hide caption

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Tamir Kalifa for NPR

Her son was taken by Hamas. She threw him a concert in the hopes he could hear it

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Friday

United Nations and Red Crescent workers prepare aid for distribution to Palestinians at a UNRWA warehouse in the Gaza Strip. The U.S. says 12 employees of UNRWA, which provides aid to Palestinians, were involved in Hamas' Oct. 7 attack on Israel. Hassan Eslaiah/AP hide caption

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Hassan Eslaiah/AP

Thursday

Israeli mother keeps hope alive that her son, held hostage by Hamas, will be freed

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Tuesday

Israeli military has had its deadliest single incident so far in the war in Gaza

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