Geoff Brumfiel Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk.
Geoff Brumfiel, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
Stories By

Geoff Brumfiel

Mike Morgan/NPR
Geoff Brumfiel, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Geoff Brumfiel

Senior Editor and Correspondent

Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk. His editing duties include science and space, while his reporting focuses on the intersection of science and national security.

From April of 2016 to September of 2018, Brumfiel served as an editor overseeing basic research and climate science. Prior to that, he worked for three years as a reporter covering physics and space for the network. Brumfiel has carried his microphone into ghost villages created by the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan. He's tracked the journey of highly enriched uranium as it was shipped out of Poland. For a story on how animals drink, he crouched for over an hour and tried to convince his neighbor's cat to lap a bowl of milk.

Before NPR, Brumfiel was based in London as a senior reporter for Nature Magazine from 2007-2013. There, he covered energy, space, climate, and the physical sciences. From 2002 – 2007, Brumfiel was Nature Magazine's Washington Correspondent.

Brumfiel is the 2013 winner of the Association of British Science Writers award for news reporting on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

Story Archive

The International Space Station depends on a mix of U.S. and Russian parts. "I hope we can hold it together as long as we can," says former NASA astronaut Scott Kelly. NASA hide caption

toggle caption
NASA

Russia's war in Ukraine is threatening an outpost of cooperation in space

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1098348347/1100655671" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
NPR

Laurie's mother Stephanie, 75, died of COVID-19 in December. "I don't believe she was supposed to die," Laurie says. "I blame the misinformation." Stephanie had been wrapped up in a world of conspiracy theories online which led her to refuse treatments for COVID. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Their mom died of COVID. They say conspiracy theories are what really killed her

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1089786147/1094680471" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Amazon's planned satellite fleet has some experts concerned about space congestion

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1091308672/1091308673" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Iryna Holoshchapova, a Ukrainian refugee who fled the embattled city of Mykolaiv, shows a video on her smartphone of an apartment block on fire following a Russian attack. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

The podcast Science Vs. has called on its parent company, Spotify, to curb misinformation on its platform. Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images

Fighting Misinformation With Science Journalism

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1085425659/1086986697" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant. Annotations by NPR.

Video analysis reveals Russian attack on Ukrainian nuclear plant veered near disaster

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1085427380/1085979725" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Experts worry about the accuracy of online posts depicting the war in Ukraine

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1085013124/1085013125" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A screen grab captured from a video shows a view of Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant during a fire following clashes around the site in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine. Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The fire at a nuclear power plant in Ukraine has been extinguished

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1084448633/1084448634" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Russian troops are attacking Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1084414196/1084423870" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript