Geoff Brumfiel Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk.
Geoff Brumfiel, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
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Geoff Brumfiel

Mike Morgan/NPR
Geoff Brumfiel, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Geoff Brumfiel

Senior Editor and Correspondent

Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk. His editing duties include science and space, while his reporting focuses on the intersection of science and national security.

From April of 2016 to September of 2018, Brumfiel served as an editor overseeing basic research and climate science. Prior to that, he worked for three years as a reporter covering physics and space for the network. Brumfiel has carried his microphone into ghost villages created by the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan. He's tracked the journey of highly enriched uranium as it was shipped out of Poland. For a story on how animals drink, he crouched for over an hour and tried to convince his neighbor's cat to lap a bowl of milk.

Before NPR, Brumfiel was based in London as a senior reporter for Nature Magazine from 2007-2013. There, he covered energy, space, climate, and the physical sciences. From 2002 – 2007, Brumfiel was Nature Magazine's Washington Correspondent.

Brumfiel is the 2013 winner of the Association of British Science Writers award for news reporting on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

Story Archive

China's DF-17 missile is a medium-range hypersonic weapon capable of traveling over five times the speed of sound. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Behind murky claim of a new hypersonic missile test, there lies a very real arms race

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Researchers who helped shape our understanding of climate change win Nobel Prize

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White-lined sac-winged bat (saccopteryx bilineata) in the Atlantic rainforest of Brazil. Richard McManus/Getty Images hide caption

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Richard McManus/Getty Images

SURPRISE! It's A...Babbling Baby Bat?

A paper published recently in the journal Science finds similarities between the babbling of human infants and the babbling of the greater sac-winged bat (Saccopteryx bilineata) — a small species of bat that lives in Central and South America. As science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel reports, the researchers believe both bats and humans evolved babbling as a precursor to more complex vocal behavior like singing, or, in the case of people, talking.

SURPRISE! It's A...Babbling Baby Bat?

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YouTube Is Cracking Down On Videos And Creators Sharing COVID Vaccine Misinformation

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Over many decades studying sequoias, Nate Stephenson had never seen old-growth sequoias die in large numbers until recently. "That's just unheard of," he says. When the first images emerged after the Castle Fire hit, he wasn't prepared. Lauren Sommer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Sommer/NPR

Dr. Simone Gold discourages vaccination against COVID-19 and promotes alternative, unproven therapies. She has spent much of the past year speaking at events like this one held in West Palm Beach, Fla., in December. The conference was aimed at young people ages 15 to 25. Gage Skidmore hide caption

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Gage Skidmore

This Doctor Spread False Information About COVID. She Still Kept Her Medical License

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NASA Helicopter Has Been Zipping About On Mars, Paving The Way For Drone Exploration

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Biden To Receive A Classified Report On The Origins Of COVID-19

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After listening to hours of bat pups in the wild, scientists have identified eight characteristics of babbling that are shared by human babies and the greater sac-winged bat. B.G. Thomson/Science Source hide caption

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B.G. Thomson/Science Source

Bats Love To Babble — Just Like Humans

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It's not a known side effect, but some people are experiencing changes to their menstrual cycles after getting the COVID-19 vaccine. Reports have led some researchers to take a closer look at the possible connection. Scott Eisen/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Eisen/Getty Images

A Possible Side Effect? Thousands Of People Saw Menstruation Changes Post-Vaccine

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An image from July 26 shows a new tunnel at the Lop Nur nuclear test site. Planet Labs Inc. hide caption

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Planet Labs Inc.

A New Tunnel Is Spotted At A Chinese Nuclear Test Site

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Bezos Is Back On Earth — But The Space Tourism Industry Is Just Launching Off

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