Geoff Brumfiel Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk.
Geoff Brumfiel, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
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Geoff Brumfiel

Mike Morgan/NPR
Geoff Brumfiel, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Geoff Brumfiel

Senior Editor and Correspondent

Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk. His editing duties include science and space, while his reporting focuses on the intersection of science and national security.

From April of 2016 to September of 2018, Brumfiel served as an editor overseeing basic research and climate science. Prior to that, he worked for three years as a reporter covering physics and space for the network. Brumfiel has carried his microphone into ghost villages created by the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan. He's tracked the journey of highly enriched uranium as it was shipped out of Poland. For a story on how animals drink, he crouched for over an hour and tried to convince his neighbor's cat to lap a bowl of milk.

Before NPR, Brumfiel was based in London as a senior reporter for Nature Magazine from 2007-2013. There, he covered energy, space, climate, and the physical sciences. From 2002 – 2007, Brumfiel was Nature Magazine's Washington Correspondent.

Brumfiel is the 2013 winner of the Association of British Science Writers award for news reporting on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

Story Archive

The Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant in Ukraine, as seen from across the Dneiper River. Rehman/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Rehman/Wikimedia Commons

The last reactor at Europe's largest nuclear power plant has stopped

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The Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant has been cut off from the electricity grid since September 5. Nuclear plants require power to keep their reactors cool. ED JONES/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ED JONES/AFP via Getty Images

Here's why the risk of a nuclear accident in Ukraine has 'significantly increased'

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A sixth reactor at Ukraine's Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant is now off the grid

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Rafael Mariano Grossi, director general of the International Atomic Energy Agency, arrives in a hotel with a delegation in Zaporizhzia, Ukraine, on Aug. 31. The delegation will travel to the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant amid the Russia-Ukraine war. Metin Aktas/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Metin Aktas/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

What inspectors will look for at Ukraine's war-damaged Zaporizhzhia nuclear plant

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Nuclear inspectors arrive at Zaporizhzhia power plant in Ukraine

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Ukrainian nuclear plant, controlled by Russian forces, temporarily went off line

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A Russian serviceman patrols Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Station on May 1. A series of exchanges in recent weeks has made conditions at the plant more dangerous. Andrey Borodulin/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrey Borodulin/AFP via Getty Images

Ivermectin has developed an enormous following over the course of the pandemic – in part because of a small cadre of fringe doctors who promote it as an alternative to COVID vaccines, despite early studies which didn't support it as a treatment. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Doubting mainstream medicine, COVID patients find dangerous advice and pills online

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Making Space Travel Accessible For People With Disabilities

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The Soyuz-2.1a rocket booster with cargo transportation spacecraft Progress МS-20 blasts off at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Friday, June 3, 2022. AP hide caption

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AP

Encore: Scientists hope a volcano's song could contain clues to its future eruptions

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