Geoff Brumfiel Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk.
Geoff Brumfiel, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
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Geoff Brumfiel

Mike Morgan/NPR
Geoff Brumfiel, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Geoff Brumfiel

Senior Editor and Correspondent

Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk. His editing duties include science and space, while his reporting focuses on the intersection of science and national security.

From April of 2016 to September of 2018, Brumfiel served as an editor overseeing basic research and climate science. Prior to that, he worked for three years as a reporter covering physics and space for the network. Brumfiel has carried his microphone into ghost villages created by the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan. He's tracked the journey of highly enriched uranium as it was shipped out of Poland. For a story on how animals drink, he crouched for over an hour and tried to convince his neighbor's cat to lap a bowl of milk.

Before NPR, Brumfiel was based in London as a senior reporter for Nature Magazine from 2007-2013. There, he covered energy, space, climate, and the physical sciences. From 2002 – 2007, Brumfiel was Nature Magazine's Washington Correspondent.

Brumfiel is the 2013 winner of the Association of British Science Writers award for news reporting on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

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Story Archive

Can Space Traffic Control Handle The Volume Of Private Launches?

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Growing Public Evidence Suggests Ukrainian Jetliner Was Hit By Missile

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Rescue crews work at the crash site of a Ukrainian airliner that went down shortly after takeoff from Tehran's Imam Khomeini International Airport on Wednesday, killing all 176 people onboard. Mazyar Asadi/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty hide caption

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Mazyar Asadi/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty

What Is Known About Iran's Nuclear Capabilities

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What Do We Know About Iran's Missiles And Its Arsenal Of Weapons?

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Iraq's Parliament Calls For Expulsion Of U.S. Troops

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Astronomers Carefully Watching Betelgeuse Star, Wondering If It's Nearing Explosion

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Experts worry that North Korea may be about to test an advanced solid-fuel missile. Wong Maye-E/AP hide caption

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Wong Maye-E/AP

North Korea Promises A Christmas Surprise. Here Are The Options

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The comet 2I/Borisov as imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope on October 12. Borisov will swing by the sun and then head back into deep space. NASA, ESA and D. Jewitt (UCLA) hide caption

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NASA, ESA and D. Jewitt (UCLA)

A Comet From Another Star Hints That Our Solar System Isn't One-Of-A-Kind

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From NASA: Apollo 12 commander Charles "Pete" Conrad unfurls the United States flag on the lunar surface during the first extravehicular activity on Nov. 19, 1969. NASA hide caption

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NASA

50 Years Ago, Americans Made The 2nd Moon Landing... Why Doesn't Anyone Remember?

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It's Been 50 Years Since Apollo 12 Landed On The Moon

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Satellite imagery from Nov. 13 shows rows of airplanes in Wonsan, North Korea. Planet Labs Inc. hide caption

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Planet Labs Inc.

North Korea Seen Lining Up Military Aircraft For Possible Show

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