Geoff Brumfiel Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk.
Geoff Brumfiel, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
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Geoff Brumfiel

Mike Morgan/NPR
Geoff Brumfiel, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Geoff Brumfiel

Senior Editor and Correspondent

Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk. His editing duties include science and space, while his reporting focuses on the intersection of science and national security.

From April of 2016 to September of 2018, Brumfiel served as an editor overseeing basic research and climate science. Prior to that, he worked for three years as a reporter covering physics and space for the network. Brumfiel has carried his microphone into ghost villages created by the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan. He's tracked the journey of highly enriched uranium as it was shipped out of Poland. For a story on how animals drink, he crouched for over an hour and tried to convince his neighbor's cat to lap a bowl of milk.

Before NPR, Brumfiel was based in London as a senior reporter for Nature Magazine from 2007-2013. There, he covered energy, space, climate, and the physical sciences. From 2002 – 2007, Brumfiel was Nature Magazine's Washington Correspondent.

Brumfiel is the 2013 winner of the Association of British Science Writers award for news reporting on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

Story Archive

Wednesday

LUVLIMAGE/Getty Images

Time is so much weirder than it seems

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Sunday

For space exploration, 2022 was a year full of cosmic milestones

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Friday

Far from the Earth, time gets extremely weird. Black holes can cause it to stretch and even break down entirely. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

Researchers say time is an illusion. So why are we all obsessed with it?

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Thursday

Physicists are still trying to understand time

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Secretary of Energy Jennifer Granholm announces a major scientific breakthrough in fusion research that was made at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, during a news conference on Tuesday, Dec. 13, 2022. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Wednesday

How close are we actually to fusion energy powering society?

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Tuesday

The facility uses powerful lasers to compress fuel pellets. The result is nuclear fusion, the process that powers the Sun and the world's largest nuclear weapons. Don Jedlovec/LLNL/NNSA hide caption

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Don Jedlovec/LLNL/NNSA

U.S. reaches a fusion power milestone. Will it be enough to save the planet?

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Monday

How yeast will teach NASA about the dangers of space

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Sunday

The world is doing away with the leap second

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Friday

Former President Trump tweeted a classified satellite photo in 2019

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Tuesday

Researchers dig into why nose-picking is a common behavior

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Wednesday

Minnesota Republican Scott Jensen has appeared with numerous anti-vaccine activists. Their support may have helped him win the state primary for governor. Ben Mulholland/Gray Television/Pool/via AP hide caption

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Ben Mulholland/Gray Television/Pool/via AP

Vaccines used to be apolitical. Now they're a campaign issue

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Thursday

A Neanderthal skeleton on display in 2018 at the Musee de l'Homme in Paris. Researchers extracted DNA from bones found in Russia to learn more about how their communities were organized. Stephane de Sakutin/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stephane de Sakutin/AFP via Getty Images

Genetic sequencing gives us the first-ever look at a Neanderthal clan

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