Geoff Brumfiel Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk.
Geoff Brumfiel, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
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Geoff Brumfiel

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Geoff Brumfiel, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Geoff Brumfiel

Senior Editor and Correspondent

Geoff Brumfiel works as a senior editor and correspondent on NPR's science desk. His editing duties include science and space, while his reporting focuses on the intersection of science and national security.

From April of 2016 to September of 2018, Brumfiel served as an editor overseeing basic research and climate science. Prior to that, he worked for three years as a reporter covering physics and space for the network. Brumfiel has carried his microphone into ghost villages created by the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan. He's tracked the journey of highly enriched uranium as it was shipped out of Poland. For a story on how animals drink, he crouched for over an hour and tried to convince his neighbor's cat to lap a bowl of milk.

Before NPR, Brumfiel was based in London as a senior reporter for Nature Magazine from 2007-2013. There, he covered energy, space, climate, and the physical sciences. From 2002 – 2007, Brumfiel was Nature Magazine's Washington Correspondent.

Brumfiel is the 2013 winner of the Association of British Science Writers award for news reporting on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

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Nearly a third of adults in the U.S. have gotten at least one shot of the COVID-19 vaccine so far, but researchers warn that vaccine refusal may keep the country from reaching herd immunity. John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Vaccine Refusal May Put Herd Immunity At Risk, Researchers Warn

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Herd Immunity Is At Risk If Many People In U.S. Say 'No' To Vaccine

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Google is one of the companies investing in building quantum computers. Google hide caption

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Google

Is The Future Quantum?

NPR science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel takes us to IonQ, one of the companies betting on a quantum computing future. Along the way, Geoff explains what little researchers know about how we might actually use this technology. There are hints though quantum computing could change everything from discovering new drugs to developing advanced materials.

Is The Future Quantum?

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The International Atomic Energy Agency has been responsible for policing the Iran deal. It has sealed some equipment, preventing its use, and installed cameras and other electronic monitoring. AFP/IRNA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/IRNA/AFP via Getty Images

With Iranian Nuclear Deal In Limbo, Some Worry Inspectors Will Lose Access For Good

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Lady Mary Wortley Montagu learned of a way to stop smallpox from women in the Ottoman Empire in the early 18th century. Trying to persuade her country to do the same proved tricky. Sepia Times/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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Sepia Times/Universal Images Group via Getty

A 300-Year-Old Tale Of One Woman's Quest To Stop A Deadly Virus

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Could Nuclear Power Aid In Travel To Mars?

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The magnets used in these letters are one of the more obvious uses of magnets, but magnets are also found in many other household objects. Fred Tanneau/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fred Tanneau/AFP via Getty Images

Magnets: The Hidden Objects Powering Your Life

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More Than 80 Nations Sign On To A New Global Treaty To Prohibit Nuclear Weapons

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In March 2018, a White House military aide carries the "football," a system that allows President Trump to launch a nuclear strike at any time. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Out Of This World: 2020's Amazing Achievements In Space

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A SpaceX Falcon9 rocket, with the Crew Dragon capsule attached, lifts off from Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39-A. Chris O'Meara/AP hide caption

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Chris O'Meara/AP

2020: At Least It Was Good For Space Exploration?

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A partial view of the complex Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN particle physics research facility. CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is the world's largest laboratory for research into particle physics. Ronald Patrick/Getty Images hide caption

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Antimatter: Matter's "Evil Twin"

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