Jasmine Garsd Jasmine Garsd is NPR's Criminal Justice correspondent and the host of The Last Cup.
Headshot of Jasmine Garsd
Stories By

Jasmine Garsd

Mark Elzey/NPR
Headshot of Jasmine Garsd
Mark Elzey/NPR

Jasmine Garsd

Host, The Last Cup, and Correspondent, Criminal Justice

Jasmine Garsd is an Argentine-American journalist living in New York. She is currently NPR's Criminal Justice correspondent and the host of The Last Cup. She started her career as the co-host of Alt.Latino, an NPR show about Latin music. Throughout her reporting career she's focused extensively on women's issues and immigrant communities in America. She's currently writing a book of stories about women she's met throughout her travels.

Story Archive

Friday

People from New England to Virginia felt shakes from 4.8 earthquake this morning

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1243146229/1243163112" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

Thursday

Asylum-seeking migrants line up in a makeshift, mountainous campsite to be processed after crossing the border with Mexico, Friday, Feb. 2, 2024, near Jacumba Hot Springs, Calif. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gregory Bull/AP

Wednesday

The last few days have been a rollercoaster for Texas' new immigration law

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1239753400/1239761039" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

Chicago shelters will start evicting migrants after a 60-day rule goes into effect

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1238741360/1238741361" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

Sen. Katie Britt, R-Ala., speaks during a news conference on the border on Feb. 15, 2023, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Britt delivered the Republican response to President Biden's State of the Union address on Thursday. Mariam Zuhaib/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mariam Zuhaib/AP

Immigrants are less likely to commit crimes than U.S.-born Americans, studies find

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1237103158/1237107896" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

Migrant border crossings into the U.S. dropped significantly in January

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1231634383/1231745909" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

Why border crossings into the U.S. plummeted in January

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1231513894/1231514270" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

With the border bill dead, here's where immigration reforms stands

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1230516258/1230517716" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

Wednesday

A proposed deal in Congress could make asylum harder for LGBTQ migrants to obtain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1229723101/1229723102" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Monday

The fight between Texas and the Feds over immigration enforcement intensifies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1227695806/1227699556" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Saturday

Migrants walk towards a Border Patrol agent in the town of Jacumba. Those crossing the border are often being instructed by cartels to turn themselves over to agents, in order to receive asylum. Ash Ponders for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ash Ponders for NPR

A California community sees a dip in immigration. Where have all the people gone?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1226570548/1227247663" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Friday

A dip in unauthorized border crossings has left a California migrant encampment empty

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1227277168/1227281057" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Alicia Zheng/NPR

Chance encounter: A young migrant takes a seat next to an NPR reporter

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1225680457/1225722392" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Monday

Supreme Court will allow removal of razor wire border barrier in Texas

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1226160432/1226160433" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

A migrant walked for 21 days to escape drug violence. But what awaits in the U.S.?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1225760882/1225761230" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

Christian Chavez/AP

Thursday

U.S. officials met with Mexico's president to press for limits on migrant surges

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1221942380/1221942381" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

U.S. and Mexican officials to discuss migrant surge at the border

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1221762112/1221762113" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

Migrants huddling for warmth at an unofficial detention camp in Jacumba, Calif. A record number of people have arrived at the southern U.S. border in the past year. Ash Ponders for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ash Ponders for NPR

An unprecedented year in immigration, and in anti-immigration rhetoric

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1221006083/1221362702" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

Clockwise, from top left: former N.J. Gov. Chris Christie, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, Vivek Ramaswamy, former U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley and former President Donald Trump. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images; Eduardo Munoz Alvarez-Pool/Getty Images; Jim Vondruska/Getty Images; Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images; Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images; Eduardo Munoz Alvarez-Pool/Getty Images; Jim Vondruska/Getty Images; Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images; Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Where the Republican presidential candidates stand on immigration

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1218935981/1219512145" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

In this photo provided by U.S. Customs and Border Protection, people taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the U.S. waited in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas, in June 2018. U.S. Customs and Border Protection's Rio Grande Valley Sector via AP hide caption

toggle caption
U.S. Customs and Border Protection's Rio Grande Valley Sector via AP

Thursday

Does George Santos' district want him expelled from the House? Here's what some say

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1216222954/1216237525" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript