Ari Daniel Ari Daniel is a reporter for NPR's Science desk where he covers global health and development.
Ari Daniel headshot
Stories By

Ari Daniel

Amanda Kowalski
Ari Daniel headshot
Amanda Kowalski

Ari Daniel

Reporter, Science Desk

Ari Daniel is a reporter for NPR's Science desk where he covers global health and development.

Ari has always been drawn to science and the natural world. As a graduate student, Ari trained gray seal pups (Halichoerus grypus) for his Master's degree in animal behavior at the University of St. Andrews, and helped tag wild Norwegian killer whales (Orcinus orca) for his Ph.D. in biological oceanography at MIT and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. For more than a decade, as a science reporter and multimedia producer, Ari has interviewed a species he's better equipped to understand – Homo sapiens.

Over the years, Ari has reported across five continents on science topics ranging from astronomy to zooxanthellae. His radio pieces have aired on NPR, The World, Radiolab, Here & Now, and Living on Earth. Ari formerly worked as the Senior Digital Producer at NOVA where he helped oversee the production of the show's digital video content. He is a co-recipient of the AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Gold Award for his stories on glaciers and climate change in Greenland and Iceland.

In the fifth grade, Ari won the "Most Contagious Smile" award.

Story Archive

A health worker vaccinates a Kenyan child with the world's first malaria vaccine. Kenya has given at least one dose to 300,000 children so far. Brian Ongoro /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brian Ongoro /AFP via Getty Images

First malaria vaccine hits 1 million dose milestone — although it has its shortcomings

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1098536246/1098865324" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A child receives a polio vaccine in Kampala, Uganda, on Jan. 14, 2022. Nicholas Kajoba/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nicholas Kajoba/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images

Vaccine-derived polio is on the rise. A new vaccine aims to stop the spread

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1092867458/1094888920" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The World Health Organization approves a new polio vaccine for emergency use

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1093005956/1093005957" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A blood transfusion station is cobbled together after a Russian attack on a hospital in Chernihiv in northern Ukraine. Oleksandr Ryzhenko hide caption

toggle caption
Oleksandr Ryzhenko

War In Ukraine Sets Back Tuberculosis Treatment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1091060942/1091529039" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. Oleksandr Ryzhenko worked as a pediatric surgeon before the war. A health department doctor observed that his hands are "capable of big miracles." Now he volunteers at City Hospital No. 2 as a trauma surgeon. Oleksandr Ryzhenko hide caption

toggle caption
Oleksandr Ryzhenko

Doctors in Chernihiv bear witness to their hospital's fate after Russian shelling

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1091333939/1091394412" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Badly damaged Ukrainian hospital struggles to provide emergency services

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1091382698/1091382699" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Using a process similar to how soda is made, scientists have created yeast-free pizza

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1088097094/1088097095" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Traditionally, pizza dough is made by allowing yeast to ferment the flour and water until air bubbles form in the dough. But scientists in Naples are developing a new approach – one that doesn't rely on yeast. EMS-FORSTER-PRODUCTIONS/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
EMS-FORSTER-PRODUCTIONS/Getty Images

Italian scientists hacked pizza physics to make dough without yeast

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1087961262/1088150950" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Refugees from Ukraine, which has a high rate of tuberculosis, are often screened for the disease. Above: Dr. Natalie Wöhrle analyzes the X-ray images of the lungs from a screening in Gauting, Germany, on March 12. Matthias Balk/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Matthias Balk/picture alliance via Getty Images

Russia's war with Ukraine is devastating for Ukraine's war on TB

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1087538209/1089533828" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Aleksandra Shchebet Eugenia Zabuga/Aleksandra Shchebet hide caption

toggle caption
Eugenia Zabuga/Aleksandra Shchebet

The humble bravery of a young neurologist from Kyiv

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1086153594/1086330068" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Two white-tailed deer forage in Pennsylvania's Wyomissing Parklands. At the end of 2021, researchers swabbed the noses of 93 dead deer from across the state. Nearly 20% tested positive for the coronavirus. Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images

Researcher finds 'stunning' rate of COVID among deer. Here's what it means for humans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1084440012/1087292284" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Hamsters in Hong Kong are euthanized after pet shop owner gets COVID-19

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1083881247/1083881248" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Corals around the world have been dying because of warming waters and pollution. Some researchers hope they can reverse the trend by growing new corals in the lab. Albert Kok/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

toggle caption
Albert Kok/Wikimedia Commons

As Corals Wither Around The World, Scientists Try IVF

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/556121513/573628906" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mathematicians Could Help In Gerrymandering Legal Cases

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/544259815/544259816" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript