Ari Daniel Ari Daniel is a freelance contributor to NPR's Science desk.
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Ari Daniel

Amanda Kowalski
Ari Daniel headshot
Amanda Kowalski

Ari Daniel

Ari Daniel is a freelance contributor to NPR's Science desk.

He has always been drawn to science and the natural world. As a graduate student, he trained gray seal pups (Halichoerus grypus) for his Master's degree in animal behavior at the University of St. Andrews, and helped tag wild Norwegian killer whales (Orcinus orca) for his Ph.D. in biological oceanography at MIT and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. For more than a decade, as a science reporter and multimedia producer, he has interviewed a species he's better equipped to understand — Homo sapiens.

Over the years, he has reported across six continents on science topics ranging from astronomy to zooxanthellae. His radio pieces have aired on NPR, The World, Radiolab, Here & Now, and Living on Earth. He formerly worked as a reporter for NPR's Science desk where he covered global health and development. Before that, he was the Senior Digital Producer at NOVA where he helped oversee the production of the show's digital video content. He is a co-recipient of the AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Gold Award for his radio stories on glaciers and climate change in Greenland and Iceland.

In the fifth grade, he won the "Most Contagious Smile" award.

Story Archive

Sunday

By accident, scientists found an underwater 'megastructure' from the Stone Age

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Thursday

A 3D model of a short section of the stone wall. The scale at the bottom of the image measures 50 cm. Photos by Philipp Hoy, University of Rostock; model created using Agisoft Metashape by J. Auer, LAKD M-V hide caption

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Photos by Philipp Hoy, University of Rostock; model created using Agisoft Metashape by J. Auer, LAKD M-V

Scientists scanning the seafloor discover a long-lost Stone Age 'megastructure'

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Monday

By accident, scientists found an underwater 'megastructure' from the Stone Age

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Thursday

A vaccine for Ebola could change the mortality rates for those infected

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Janine Kibwana, Ebola survivor and mother of five, sits in her living room in Beni, Democratic Republic of the Congo. Researchers studying the DRC's most recent Ebola outbreak say that a new vaccine can dramatically reduce the risk of dying from the disease. John Wessels/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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John Wessels/AFP via Getty Images

Thursday

A sea otter in the estuarine water of Elkhorn Slough, Monterey Bay, Calif. Emma Levy hide caption

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Emma Levy

California sea otters nearly went extinct. Now they're rescuing their coastal habitat

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Tuesday

Sea otters are making a comeback in California — and they're curbing erosion

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Thursday

Spiderwebs can act as air filters that catch environmental DNA from terrestrial vertebrates, scientists say. Rob Stothard/Getty Images hide caption

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Rob Stothard/Getty Images

Need to track animals around the world? Tap into the 'spider-verse,' scientists say

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Wednesday

Spiderwebs could offer a snapshot of an ecosystem, study shows

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Tuesday

Estelle Laughlin, 94, survived the Nazi concentration camps along with her older sister and mother. She was photographed in her living room in Lincolnshire, Illinois, on October 6, 2023. Jamie Kelter Davis for NPR hide caption

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Jamie Kelter Davis for NPR

Sunday

The megalodon maybe wasn't so mega, research suggests

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Friday

Douglas Long

That giant extinct shark, Megalodon? Maybe it wasn't so mega

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Tuesday

The megalodon maybe wasn't so mega, research suggests

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Kelp forests are tiered like terrestrial rainforests and serve as key habitats for many marine animals. NOAA hide caption

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NOAA

New fossils suggest kelp forests have swayed in the seas for at least 32 million years

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Monday

New kelp fossils may help explain the Pacific Ocean's underwater jungles

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Thursday

The earliest detection of a black hole is made by the James Webb Telescope

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Wednesday

This image shows a 'close-up' of the galaxy GN-z11 as imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope, superimposed on top of another image marking the galaxy's location in the sky. NASA hide caption

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NASA

James Webb Telescope detects earliest known black hole — it's really big for its age

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Sunday

A demonstration at the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, in 2023. A perennial Davos topic is how to improve the lives of the world's poor. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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Markus Schreiber/AP

So far it's a grand decade for billionaires, says new report. As for the masses ...

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Sunday

Study sheds new light on the social evolution of primates

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Thursday

WHO warns illness in Gaza may ultimately kill more people than Israel's offensive

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Tuesday

Concern grows over infectious disease outbreaks in Gaza

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Palestinian children, having fled the Israeli bombing of the northern Gaza Strip in response to the Oct. 7 attack by Hamas, are living in temporary shelters at Al-Aqsa Martyrs Hospital. Global health groups say they are doing what they can to keep a lid on infectious diseases amid crowded, unsanitary conditions and a devastated health-care system. Majdi Fathi/NurPhoto via Reuters Connect hide caption

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Majdi Fathi/NurPhoto via Reuters Connect

Health workers struggle to prevent an infectious disease 'disaster in waiting' in Gaza

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Saturday

Scientists measured the brainwaves of cud-chewing reindeer, and found that they are similar to those of deep sleep. Leo Rescia hide caption

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Leo Rescia

How the real-life Rudolphs get enough rest: Sleep while you chew!

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Reindeer catch up on sleep when you would least expect it

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