Anya Kamenetz Anya Kamenetz is an education correspondent at NPR.
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Anya Kamenetz

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Anya Kamanetz 2017
Will O'Hare/NPR

Anya Kamenetz

Education Correspondent

Anya Kamenetz is an education correspondent at NPR. She joined NPR in 2014, working as part of a new initiative to coordinate on-air and online coverage of learning. Since then the NPR Ed team has won a 2017 Edward R. Murrow Award for Innovation, and a 2015 National Award for Education Reporting for the multimedia national collaboration, the Grad Rates project.

Kamenetz is the author of several books. Her latest is The Art of Screen Time: How Your Family Can Balance Digital Media and Real Life (PublicAffairs, 2018). Her previous books touched on student loans, innovations to address cost, quality, and access in higher education, and issues of assessment and excellence: Generation Debt; DIY U: Edupunks, Edupreneurs, and the Coming Transformation of Higher Education, and The Test.

Kamenetz covered technology, innovation, sustainability, and social entrepreneurship for five years as a staff writer for Fast Company magazine. She's contributed to The New York Times, The Washington Post, New York Magazine and Slate, and appeared in documentaries shown on PBS and CNN.

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Rupali Limaye is a behavioral and social scientist at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health hide caption

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Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Cori Berg is executive director of the Hope Day School early childhood program in Dallas. Cooper Neill for NPR hide caption

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Cooper Neill for NPR

Parents and caregivers of young children say they've hit pandemic rock bottom

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The omicron variant is wreaking havoc at day care centers

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Students wearing masks board a school bus outside a Manhattan school on Tuesday, Dec. 21, 2021, in New York. Brittainy Newman / AP hide caption

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Brittainy Newman / AP

How the current COVID surge is hurting learning and kids' mental health

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In Chicago, the teachers union voted this week to return to virtual learning, citing COVID-19 concerns, despite district plans to continue in person. In response, the district canceled classes for its more than 300,000 students. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

What it really takes to keep schools open during the omicron surge

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A Hollywood, Calif., classroom sits empty in August 2020. At least 3,229 schools around the U.S. announced they were canceling in-person learning as of Monday evening. Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images hide caption

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Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images

Officials are determined to keep schools open, despite omicron

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Schools will usher in another new year defined by the pandemic

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An empty classroom during the pandemic in Seoul, South Korea. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

$17 trillion: That's how much the pandemic could take away from today's kids

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How school closures from COVID-19 have cost society

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Grimsley High School teacher Sierra Hannipole checks in with a student at the Greensboro, N.C., school's learning hub. According to new federal data, 6 in 10 schools around the U.S., including Grimsley, have given extra training to teachers to support students socially and emotionally this school year. Cornell Watson for NPR hide caption

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Cornell Watson for NPR

Sophomore Dreshon Robinson stands outside his high school cafeteria, where the learning hub takes place. He wants to go to college and be an audio engineer. Cornell Watson for NPR hide caption

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Cornell Watson for NPR

Extra learning time is helping these students catch up from COVID interruptions

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Parents are scrambling after schools suddenly cancel class over staffing and burnout

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