Anya Kamenetz Anya Kamenetz is an education correspondent at NPR.
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Anya Kamenetz

Will O'Hare/NPR
Anya Kamanetz 2017
Will O'Hare/NPR

Anya Kamenetz

Education Correspondent

Anya Kamenetz is an education correspondent at NPR. She joined NPR in 2014, working as part of a new initiative to coordinate on-air and online coverage of learning. Since then the NPR Ed team has won a 2017 Edward R. Murrow Award for Innovation, and a 2015 National Award for Education Reporting for the multimedia national collaboration, the Grad Rates project.

Kamenetz is the author of several books. Her latest is The Art of Screen Time: How Your Family Can Balance Digital Media and Real Life (PublicAffairs, 2018). Her previous books touched on student loans, innovations to address cost, quality, and access in higher education, and issues of assessment and excellence: Generation Debt; DIY U: Edupunks, Edupreneurs, and the Coming Transformation of Higher Education, and The Test.

Kamenetz covered technology, innovation, sustainability, and social entrepreneurship for five years as a staff writer for Fast Company magazine. She's contributed to The New York Times, The Washington Post, New York Magazine and Slate, and appeared in documentaries shown on PBS and CNN.

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Story Archive

Ran Zheng for NPR

Sparkle Unicorns And Fart Ninjas: What Parents Can Do About Gendered Toys

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President Donald Trump speaks during an executive order signing on Thursday. Trump signed an executive order requiring colleges to certify that they accept free and open inquiry in order to get federal grants. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Rob Dobi/For NPR

Does It Matter Where You Go To College? Some Context For The Admissions Scandal

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What A Surge Of Teacher Strikes Nationwide Do And Don't Have In Common

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The recommendations on discipline form part of a broader effort by the Trump administration and U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos to back away from Obama-era policies aimed at reducing racial disparities in suspensions and expulsions. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

DeVos To Rescind Obama-Era Guidance On School Discipline

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Jasjyot Singh Hans for NPR

Teen Girls And Their Moms Get Candid About Phones And Social Media

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With Lawsuits Looming, $150 Million In Student Loan Debt Cancelled

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Under Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, the department took a series of steps to try to delay borrower defense from going into effect. Cheriss May/Getty Images hide caption

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Defeated In Court, Education Dept. To Cancel $150 Million Of Student Loan Debt

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