Anya Kamenetz Anya Kamenetz is NPR's lead education blogger.
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Anya Kamanetz 2017
Will O'Hare/NPR

Anya Kamenetz

Lead Blogger, Education

Anya Kamenetz is NPR's lead education blogger. She joined NPR in 2014, working as part of a new initiative to coordinate on-air and online coverage of learning.

Kamenetz is the author of several books. Her latest is The Art of Screen Time: How Your Family Can Balance Digital Media and Real Life (PublicAffairs, 2018).

Her previous books were Generation Debt; DIY U: Edupunks, Edupreneurs, and the Coming Transformation of Higher Education, and The Test.

Kamenetz covered technology, innovation, sustainability, and social entrepreneurship for five years as a staff writer for Fast Company magazine. She's contributed to The New York Times, The Washington Post, New York Magazine, Slate, and O, the Oprah Magazine, and appeared in documentaries shown on PBS and CNN.

Kamenetz was named a 2010 Game Changer in Education by the Huffington Post, received 2009, 2010, and 2015 National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, and won an Edward R. Murrow Award for innovation in 2017 along with the rest of the NPR Ed team.

Kamenetz grew up in Baton Rouge and New Orleans, Louisiana, in a family of writers and mystics, and graduated from Yale University in 2002. She lives in New York City.

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Story Archive

WHO Recognizes Gaming Disorder As A Mental Health Condition

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A Guide To Parental Controls For Kids' Tech Use

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The one-room schoolhouse of Colonial days was a simple design built from local materials. Kids sat on benches with the oldest in the back. While nostalgia has kept these in our minds, they were hardly conducive for much beyond basic rote learning. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

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Century-Old Decisions That Impact Children Every Day

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The findings discussed in Meaningful Differences in the Everyday Experience of Young American Children have been cited more than 8,000 times, according to Google Scholar. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Let's Stop Talking About The '30 Million Word Gap'

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Teachers and supporters hold signs during a 'March For Students And Rally For Respect' protest in Raleigh, North Carolina on Wednesday, May 16, 2018. Charles Mostoller/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Cristina Chase Lane (left) and WinnieHope Mamboleo recently graduated from North Carolina State University's College of Education. Leah Jarvis/NC State College of Education hide caption

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Leah Jarvis/NC State College of Education

Before They Walk Into A Classroom, These New Teachers Will March On The N.C. Capitol

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