Anya Kamenetz Anya Kamenetz is an education correspondent at NPR.
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Anya Kamenetz

Will O'Hare/NPR
Anya Kamanetz 2017
Will O'Hare/NPR

Anya Kamenetz

Education Correspondent

Anya Kamenetz is an education correspondent at NPR. She joined NPR in 2014, working as part of a new initiative to coordinate on-air and online coverage of learning. Since then the NPR Ed team has won a 2017 Edward R. Murrow Award for Innovation, and a 2015 National Award for Education Reporting for the multimedia national collaboration, the Grad Rates project.

Kamenetz is the author of several books. Her latest is The Art of Screen Time: How Your Family Can Balance Digital Media and Real Life (PublicAffairs, 2018). Her previous books touched on student loans, innovations to address cost, quality, and access in higher education, and issues of assessment and excellence: Generation Debt; DIY U: Edupunks, Edupreneurs, and the Coming Transformation of Higher Education, and The Test.

Kamenetz covered technology, innovation, sustainability, and social entrepreneurship for five years as a staff writer for Fast Company magazine. She's contributed to The New York Times, The Washington Post, New York Magazine and Slate, and appeared in documentaries shown on PBS and CNN.

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Story Archive

Hear My Voice/Escucha Mi Voz includes a child's account of crossing the Rio Grande. (Excerpted from Hear My Voice/Escucha mi voz. Foreword by Michael Garcia Bochenek; Compiled by Warren Binford; Workman Publishing. Copyright 2021.) Adriana Campos/Workman Publishing hide caption

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Adriana Campos/Workman Publishing

Asian Americans Most Likely To Be Learning Remotely

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New Data Reveals School Attendance Numbers During The Pandemic

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Jasjyot Singh Hans for NPR

COVID-19 Lockdowns Have Been Hard On Youth Locked Up

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Erick M. Ramos for NPR

How To Talk — And Listen — To A Teen With Mental Health Struggles

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New Data Highlight Disparities In Students Learning In Person

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The CDC Says A Distance Of 3 Feet Between Students In A Classroom Setting Is Safe

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Jeevan Guha, 6, offers a view of pandemic-era schooling with this homemade sign in San Francisco. The sign reads, "I miss my school." Yalonda M. James/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images hide caption

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Yalonda M. James/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images

CDC Says Schools Can Now Space Students 3 Feet Apart, Rather Than 6

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The Latest Stimulus Package Includes $130 Billion For K-12 Education

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Kendra Mendoza's son, Joshua, has cerebral palsy. She says he loves school, but got little of the therapy he needed this spring. Scott Alario for NPR hide caption

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Scott Alario for NPR

Checking Back With A Teacher, College Student and Mother After A Year At Home

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What The $300 A Month Child Benefit Could Mean For A Family On The Edge

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NPR/Ipsos Poll: Nearly One-Third Of Parents May Stick With Remote Learning

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With One Move, Congress Could Lift Millions Of Children Out Of Poverty

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