Anya Kamenetz Anya Kamenetz is NPR's lead education blogger.
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Anya Kamanetz 2017
Will O'Hare/NPR

Anya Kamenetz

Lead Blogger, Education

Anya Kamenetz is NPR's lead education blogger. She joined NPR in 2014, working as part of a new initiative to coordinate on-air and online coverage of learning.

Kamenetz is the author of several books. Her latest is The Art of Screen Time: How Your Family Can Balance Digital Media and Real Life (PublicAffairs, 2018).

Her previous books were Generation Debt; DIY U: Edupunks, Edupreneurs, and the Coming Transformation of Higher Education, and The Test.

Kamenetz covered technology, innovation, sustainability, and social entrepreneurship for five years as a staff writer for Fast Company magazine. She's contributed to The New York Times, The Washington Post, New York Magazine, Slate, and O, the Oprah Magazine, and appeared in documentaries shown on PBS and CNN.

Kamenetz was named a 2010 Game Changer in Education by the Huffington Post, received 2009, 2010, and 2015 National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, and won an Edward R. Murrow Award for innovation in 2017 along with the rest of the NPR Ed team.

Kamenetz grew up in Baton Rouge and New Orleans, Louisiana, in a family of writers and mystics, and graduated from Yale University in 2002. She lives in New York City.

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NPR/Ipsos Poll: Most Americans Support Teachers' Right To Strike

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Professors Are Targets In Online Culture Wars; Some Fight Back

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Maggie Webb, a junior high school math teacher at Clark Avenue School in Chelsea, Mass., volunteered to teach in a high-needs area in exchange for a federal grant called the TEACH grant. But a new report found that Webb and thousands of others had their grants converted to loans because of seemingly minor issues. Kayana Szymczak for NPR hide caption

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Teachers Sarah Lindenberg and Kara Cisco chat with Kelly Brown, the BARR coordinator at St. Louis Park. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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How More Meetings Might Be The Secret To Fixing High School

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