Anya Kamenetz Anya Kamenetz is NPR's lead education blogger.
Will O'Hare/NPR
Anya Kamanetz 2017
Will O'Hare/NPR

Anya Kamenetz

Lead Blogger, Education

Anya Kamenetz is NPR's lead education blogger. She joined NPR in 2014, working as part of a new initiative to coordinate on-air and online coverage of learning.

Kamenetz is the author of several books. Her latest is The Art of Screen Time: How Your Family Can Balance Digital Media and Real Life (PublicAffairs, 2018).

Her previous books were Generation Debt; DIY U: Edupunks, Edupreneurs, and the Coming Transformation of Higher Education, and The Test.

Kamenetz covered technology, innovation, sustainability, and social entrepreneurship for five years as a staff writer for Fast Company magazine. She's contributed to The New York Times, The Washington Post, New York Magazine, Slate, and O, the Oprah Magazine, and appeared in documentaries shown on PBS and CNN.

Kamenetz was named a 2010 Game Changer in Education by the Huffington Post, received 2009, 2010, and 2015 National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, and won an Edward R. Murrow Award for innovation in 2017 along with the rest of the NPR Ed team.

Kamenetz grew up in Baton Rouge and New Orleans, Louisiana, in a family of writers and mystics, and graduated from Yale University in 2002. She lives in New York City.

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Story Archive

Nathan Powers, 3, offers his father, Adam Powers, a flower while he talks with campus representatives at the Spring Fair at Evergreen State College's Tacoma, Wash. campus on May 19. Powers, of Des Moines, Wash., works at a nonprofit and is considering going back to school. Jovelle Tamayo for NPR hide caption

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Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

Activists rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on Feb. 26. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Is This Supreme Court Decision The End Of Teachers Unions?

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Schools Are Out For The Summer, But The Debate On How To Make Them Safer Continues

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Students wear clear backpacks outside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., on Monday. The bags are one of a number of security measures the school district has enacted as a result of the Feb. 14 shooting at the school that killed 17. Sun Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Making Schools Safer: Harsh Consequences, Or Second Chances?

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WHO Recognizes Gaming Disorder As A Mental Health Condition

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