Anya Kamenetz Anya Kamenetz is an education correspondent at NPR.
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Anya Kamenetz

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Anya Kamanetz 2017
Will O'Hare/NPR

Anya Kamenetz

Education Correspondent

Anya Kamenetz is an education correspondent at NPR. She joined NPR in 2014, working as part of a new initiative to coordinate on-air and online coverage of learning. Since then the NPR Ed team has won a 2017 Edward R. Murrow Award for Innovation, and a 2015 National Award for Education Reporting for the multimedia national collaboration, the Grad Rates project.

Kamenetz is the author of several books. Her latest is The Art of Screen Time: How Your Family Can Balance Digital Media and Real Life (PublicAffairs, 2018). Her previous books touched on student loans, innovations to address cost, quality, and access in higher education, and issues of assessment and excellence: Generation Debt; DIY U: Edupunks, Edupreneurs, and the Coming Transformation of Higher Education, and The Test.

Kamenetz covered technology, innovation, sustainability, and social entrepreneurship for five years as a staff writer for Fast Company magazine. She's contributed to The New York Times, The Washington Post, New York Magazine and Slate, and appeared in documentaries shown on PBS and CNN.

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A mother works from home while her son attends school remotely in an arranged photograph taken in Miami in September. Jayme Gershen/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Jayme Gershen/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Virtual Charter Schools Are Booming, Despite A Checkered Reputation

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Students line up outside P.S. 179 in the Kensington section of Brooklyn, in New York City, to have their temperatures checked on the first day of in-person instruction, on Sept. 29. This Thursday, New York City public schools will be halting in-person instruction. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

Amid Rising Coronavirus Cases, New York City Shuts Its Schools — Again

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New York City To Close Schools For In-Person Learning

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New York City Mayor Warns Schools Might Need To Close Next Week

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Students attend class wearing face masks in Antibes, France, on Nov. 2. At the end of October, France returned to a partial national lockdown to stem a surge in coronavirus cases. Meanwhile, schools remain open. Serge Haouzi/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Serge Haouzi/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden stands on stage with his wife, Jill Biden, on Saturday in Wilmington, Del. The incoming first lady is an English professor at Northern Virginia Community College. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

What A Biden Presidency Could Mean For Education

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Tips For Talking To Children About The Election

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An employee adjusts desks in an empty classroom in New Delhi after schools there were closed in March. A new report finds 1 in 4 countries have either missed their planned school reopening date, or not yet set one. Yawar Nazir/Getty Images hide caption

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Yawar Nazir/Getty Images

Students at Hillsborough High School in Tampa, Fla., wait in line to have their temperatures checked on Aug. 31. According to an updated tracker, Florida is one of three states that will offer full-time, in-person learning to more than 75% of students by Election Day. Octavio Jones/Getty Images hide caption

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Octavio Jones/Getty Images

Students attend the first day of school in the small town of Labastida, Spain, on Sept. 8. A recent study found no link between coronavirus spikes and school reopenings in the country. Alvaro Barrientos/AP hide caption

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Alvaro Barrientos/AP

Are The Risks Of Reopening Schools Exaggerated?

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