Anya Kamenetz Anya Kamenetz is an education correspondent at NPR.
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Anya Kamenetz

Will O'Hare/NPR
Anya Kamanetz 2017
Will O'Hare/NPR

Anya Kamenetz

Education Correspondent

Anya Kamenetz is an education correspondent at NPR. She joined NPR in 2014, working as part of a new initiative to coordinate on-air and online coverage of learning. Since then the NPR Ed team has won a 2017 Edward R. Murrow Award for Innovation, and a 2015 National Award for Education Reporting for the multimedia national collaboration, the Grad Rates project.

Kamenetz is the author of several books. Her latest is The Art of Screen Time: How Your Family Can Balance Digital Media and Real Life (PublicAffairs, 2018). Her previous books touched on student loans, innovations to address cost, quality, and access in higher education, and issues of assessment and excellence: Generation Debt; DIY U: Edupunks, Edupreneurs, and the Coming Transformation of Higher Education, and The Test.

Kamenetz covered technology, innovation, sustainability, and social entrepreneurship for five years as a staff writer for Fast Company magazine. She's contributed to The New York Times, The Washington Post, New York Magazine and Slate, and appeared in documentaries shown on PBS and CNN.

Story Archive

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Parents are scrambling after schools suddenly cancel class over staffing and burnout

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What the history of student vaccination mandates means for school COVID vaccine rules

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When can kids take off their masks in school? Here's what some experts say

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Education has been a key issue in recent elections, but that might change next year

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Glenn Youngkin, governor-elect of Virginia, holds a broom while greeting attendees after speaking during an election night event in Chantilly, Va. Youngkin defeated Democrat Terry McAuliffe in Virginia's closely watched governor's race. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

School board meetings have gotten heated; this one in California is on a new level

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Karen Watkins is vice chair of the school board of Gwinnett County, a suburban county north of Atlanta. She is surprised that she has become a target for a political culture war. "I just didn't realize that it would impact the local school board," Watkins says. "Our main focus is towards student achievement and ensuring that we are producing children that are thriving." Johnathon Kelso for NPR hide caption

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Johnathon Kelso for NPR

What it's like to be on the front lines of the school board culture war

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Why Are School Board Officials Getting Death Threats?

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1 in 3 working families is struggling to find the child care they desperately need

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Michelle Kondrich for NPR

Kids are losing school days to quarantines. Here's a way to keep them in classrooms

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