Anya Kamenetz Anya Kamenetz is an education correspondent at NPR.
Anya Kamanetz 2017 square
Stories By

Anya Kamenetz

Will O'Hare/NPR
Anya Kamanetz 2017
Will O'Hare/NPR

Anya Kamenetz

Education Correspondent

Anya Kamenetz is an education correspondent at NPR. She joined NPR in 2014, working as part of a new initiative to coordinate on-air and online coverage of learning. Since then the NPR Ed team has won a 2017 Edward R. Murrow Award for Innovation, and a 2015 National Award for Education Reporting for the multimedia national collaboration, the Grad Rates project.

Kamenetz is the author of several books. Her latest is The Art of Screen Time: How Your Family Can Balance Digital Media and Real Life (PublicAffairs, 2018). Her previous books touched on student loans, innovations to address cost, quality, and access in higher education, and issues of assessment and excellence: Generation Debt; DIY U: Edupunks, Edupreneurs, and the Coming Transformation of Higher Education, and The Test.

Kamenetz covered technology, innovation, sustainability, and social entrepreneurship for five years as a staff writer for Fast Company magazine. She's contributed to The New York Times, The Washington Post, New York Magazine and Slate, and appeared in documentaries shown on PBS and CNN.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

CDC Guidelines For In-Person Learning Prove To Be An Impossible Task For Many Schools

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/970278593/970278594" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Dusan Stankovic/Getty Images

CDC Offers Clearest Guidance Yet For Reopening Schools

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/967033554/967458795" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
LA Johnson/NPR

Keep Schools Open All Summer, And Other Bold Ideas To Help Kids Catch Up

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/964524688/964528384" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Biden Administration Proposes $130 Billion To Help Schools Reopen

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/965261743/965261744" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

School children wearing facemasks walk outside Condit Elementary School near Houston in December. The U.S. Department of Education announced Friday that it will begin collecting data on the status of in-person learning during the pandemic. François Picard/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
François Picard/AFP via Getty Images

Educators Consider Extending School Schedule Into The Summer

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/962714275/962714276" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chicago Teachers Union leaders appear outside City Hall with a list of their demands and a box of coal in December. As of Tuesday, the union has failed to reach an agreement with Chicago Public Schools on a return to in-person learning. Max Herman/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Max Herman/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Don't Call It A Comeback: School Districts That Never Opened Are Having Trouble Now

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/960868462/961063836" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Biden's Plans To Reopen Schools In His First 100 Days

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/959529701/959529702" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nathan Grebil takes the temperature of a fourth-grader during a health screening in October at Bel Aire Elementary School in Tiburon, Calif. Lea Suzuki/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Lea Suzuki/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images

A fourth-grader eats breakfast at Mary L. Fonseca Elementary School in Fall River, Mass. Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Why Billions In Food Aid Hasn't Gotten To Needy Families

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/953963243/958120817" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript