Juana Summers Juana Summers is a political correspondent for NPR covering race, justice and politics.
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Juana Summers

Justin T. Gellerson
Juana Summers headshot

Juana Summers headshot

Justin T. Gellerson

Juana Summers

Political Correspondent

Juana Summers is a political correspondent for NPR covering race, justice and politics. She has covered politics since 2010 for publications including Politico, CNN and The Associated Press. She got her start in public radio at KBIA in Columbia, Mo., and also previously covered Congress for NPR.

She appears regularly on television and radio outlets to discuss national politics. In 2016, Summers was a fellow at Georgetown University's Institute of Politics and Public Service.

She is a graduate of the Missouri School of Journalism and is originally from Kansas City, Mo.

Story Archive

AAPI Voters In Nevada Talk Economy, Inflation; Gun Legislation Moves Through Congress

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Liberal activists viewed the Jan. 6 hearings at watch events across the U.S.

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More than 40 people gathered at Summit Presbyterian Church in northwest Philadelphia on Thursday to watch the first public hearing from the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection. Juana Summers/NPR hide caption

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Juana Summers/NPR

In Philadelphia, liberals gather to experience the first Jan. 6 hearing together

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John Legend poses backstage during the LDF 34th National Equal Justice Awards Dinner on May 10, 2022 in New York City. Arturo Holmes/Getty Images for Legal Defense Fund hide caption

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Arturo Holmes/Getty Images for Legal Defense Fund

John Legend wants to transform the criminal justice system, one DA at a time

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Week in politics: The abortion debate could have a heavy sway on midterms

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Young people who support access to abortion chant in front of un-scalable fence that stands around the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, on May 5, 2022. JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

Democrats hope abortion will jolt young voters to action in the midterms

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The threat to abortion rights could mobilize young voters, Democratic leaders hope

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US Vice President Kamala Harris speaks at the Emilys List National Conference and Gala in Washington, DC on May 3, 2022. BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images

Primary season begins with Indiana and Ohio

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Delegate Danica Roem applauds visitors during opening ceremonies at the start of the 2019 session of the Virginia General Assembly in Richmond. The Virginia lawmaker, the first openly transgender U.S. state legislator, has written a new memoir in which she embraces the idea of using what was written about her to empower her to tell her story. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Danica Roem did opposition research on herself. It's one way she reclaimed her story

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Danica Roem's new book shares her journey from 'closet-case trans girl' to legislator

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Liz Fosslien