Juana Summers Juana Summers is a co-host of NPR's All Things Considered.
Juana Summers
Stories By

Juana Summers

Juana Summers

Host, All Things Considered

Juana Summers is a co-host of NPR's All Things Considered, alongside Ailsa Chang, Ari Shapiro and Mary Louise Kelly. She joined All Things Considered in June 2022.

Summers previously spent more than a decade covering national politics, most recently as NPR's political correspondent covering race, justice and politics.

She covered the 2012, 2016 and 2020 presidential elections, and has also previously covered Congress for NPR. Her work has appeared in a variety of publications across multiple platforms, including Politico, CNN, Mashable and The Associated Press.

In 2016, Summers was a fellow at the Georgetown University Institute of Politics and Public Service.

She got her start in public radio at KBIA in Columbia, Mo., on the campus of the University of Missouri. She is a graduate of the Missouri School of Journalism, and is originally from Kansas City, Mo.

Story Archive

Tuesday

How the Underground Railroad got its name

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Thursday

The mayor of Kansas City recounts the shooting at a Super Bowl celebration

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House votes to impeach Mayorkas — passes by 1 vote

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Wednesday

Left: Naomi Harris, 22, is a teacher in Columbia, South Carolina, and is also part of the Union of Southern Service Workers. Right: Tarman-dre Robinson, 24, is a student at Midlands Technical College in Columbia, South Carolina. Keren Carrión/NPR hide caption

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Keren Carrión/NPR

We asked young Black voters about Biden and the Democrats. Here's what we learned

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Monday

The start of a Chiefs dynasty

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Wednesday

Why America can't seem to fix its broken immigration system

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Monday

Crews prepare the south side of the Statehouse for South Carolina Gov Nikki Haley's second inaugural on Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2015, in Columbia, S.C. Jeffrey Collins/AP hide caption

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Jeffrey Collins/AP

Sunday

Biden wins the South Carolina primary, hoping voters across the U.S. take note

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Saturday

The message matters to young Black voters weighing Biden-Harris ticket

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Friday

Rep. Jim Clyburn frames election as choice between 'loud noise' and 'quiet diplomacy'

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Tuesday

Emily Nagoski wrote a guide on finding lasting intimacy — and helped her own marriage

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Sex educator Emily Nagoski, author of the new book Come Together: The Science (and Art!) of Creating Lasting Sexual Connections, discusses what it means to be sex positive. Kelvin Murray/Getty Images hide caption

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Kelvin Murray/Getty Images

Friday

Energy secretary on the Biden administration's pause of future natural gas exports

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Four teams enter the NFL's Conference Championship with the Super Bowl in sight

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An invasion of big-headed ants has changed the landscape at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Laikipia, Kenya. Elephants wander a landscape that has fewer trees and more open grasslands. Brandon Hays hide caption

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Brandon Hays

When tiny, invasive ants go marching in ... and alter an ecosystem

At the Ol Pejeta Conservancy, a wildlife preserve in central Kenya, lions and cheetahs mingle with zebras and elephants across many miles of savannah – grasslands with "whistling thorn" acacia trees dotting the landscape here and there. Twenty years ago, the savanna was littered with them. Then came invasive big-headed ants that killed native ants — and left the acacia trees vulnerable. Over time, elephants have knocked down many of the trees. That has altered the landscape — and the diets of other animals in the local food web.

When tiny, invasive ants go marching in ... and alter an ecosystem

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Thursday

Republican and Democratic strategists weigh in on 2024 presidential race

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Wednesday

Talking Millennial stereotypes and a misunderstood generation of women

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Friday

Musician Brittney Spencer says she has Baltimore to thank for her intro to country

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Thursday

The mother of an Uvalde victim reacts to the DOJ report on the shooting

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Oil production companies in the U.S. keep consolidating

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This company has created a recipe for carbon-zero cement

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