Juana Summers Juana Summers is a political reporter for NPR covering demographics and culture.
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Juana Summers

Juana Summers

Political Reporter, Demographics & Culture

Juana Summers is a political reporter for NPR covering demographics and culture. She has covered politics since 2010 for publications including Politico, CNN and The Associated Press. She got her start in public radio at KBIA in Columbia, Mo., and also previously covered Congress for NPR.

She appears regularly on television and radio outlets to discuss national politics. In 2016, Summers was a fellow at Georgetown University's Institute of Politics and Public Service. Summers is also a competitive pinball player and sits on the board of the International Flipper Pinball Association (IFPA), the governing body for competitive pinball events around the world.

She is a graduate of the Missouri School of Journalism and a native of Kansas City, Mo.

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Climate change activists holding signs join in on a rally supporting the "Green New Deal" in Pershing Square in downtown Los Angeles on Friday, May 24, 2019. Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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Richard Vogel/AP

Protesters gather near the federal prison complex in Terre Haute, Ind., in August ahead of the scheduled execution of Keith Dwayne Nelson, who was convicted of kidnapping, raping and murdering at 10-year-old Kansas girl. Democrats are pushing new legislation to outlaw federal executions. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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Michael Conroy/AP

Democrats Unveil Legislation To Abolish The Federal Death Penalty

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Activists Cite Difference Between BLM Protests, Capitol Breach

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Vice President Pence and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., preside over a joint session of Congress to ratify President-elect Joe Biden's 306-232 Electoral College win over President Trump, hours after a pro-Trump mob broke into the U.S. Capitol and disrupted proceedings. Erin Schaff/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Erin Schaff/Pool/Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden said U.S. democracy is "under unprecedented assault" in remarks on the storming of the U.S. Capitol by pro-Trump extremists on Wednesday. Above, he speaks at the Queen Theater in Wilmington, Del., on Tuesday. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

"[President-elect Joe Biden] says he opposes the death penalty, so we want him to use his clemency power and end this cruelty once and for all," said Rep.-elect Cori Bush, a Missouri Democrat. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

'End This Cruelty': Progressives Call On Biden To Work To Stop Executions

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Progressives Call On Biden To Work To Stop Executions

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Rep. Deb Haaland, D-N.M., delivers remarks after being introduced as President-elect Joe Biden's nominee to be the next secretary of interior. Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Why People Don't Vote

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Beth McDonough (center) with her wife and stepdaughter. "Whether it's right or wrong, we still look to the president's family and the vice president's family as a representation of what the quintessential American family looks like," said McDonough. Via Beth McDonough hide caption

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Via Beth McDonough

As A Stepparent, Kamala Harris Puts 'Families You Choose' In The Spotlight

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Zhanon Morales, 30, of Philadelphia raises a fist during a Nov. 5 voting rights rally. President Trump's campaign unsuccessfully used spurious claims of voter fraud to invalidate votes in Philadelphia and other largely Black cities. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Blackwell/AP

Trump Push To Invalidate Votes In Heavily Black Cities Alarms Civil Rights Groups

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Young Progressives Hope Biden Will Act On Climate Change, Gun Control, Student Debt

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In this image from video, former first lady Michelle Obama speaks during the first night of the Democratic National Convention on Aug. 17. The Democratic National Convention via AP hide caption

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The Democratic National Convention via AP