Juana Summers Juana Summers is a political correspondent for NPR covering race, justice and politics.
Stories By

Juana Summers

Juana Summers

Political Correspondent

Juana Summers is a political correspondent for NPR covering race, justice and politics. She has covered politics since 2010 for publications including Politico, CNN and The Associated Press. She got her start in public radio at KBIA in Columbia, Mo., and also previously covered Congress for NPR.

She appears regularly on television and radio outlets to discuss national politics. In 2016, Summers was a fellow at Georgetown University's Institute of Politics and Public Service.

She is a graduate of the Missouri School of Journalism and is originally from Kansas City, Mo.

Story Archive

Students wait in line to cast their ballot at a polling station on the campus of the University of California, Irvine, on Nov. 6, 2018. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Democrats Say They Have A Plan To Overcome 2022 Headwinds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1056617952/1056641938" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Democratic congressional candidate Rochelle Garza speaks with voters in Brownsville, Texas, in September. Many Latino voters in South Texas turned against Democrats during last year's presidential election — and winning them back could prove critical to the party's hopes of retaining control of Congress during next year's midterms. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Gay/AP

House Democrats have a new strategy to engage voters of color in the midterm elections

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1056280738/1056646795" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The chained hand of Archer Alexander, who was the last slave captured under the fugitive slave law, is depicted in a statue commemorating the Emancipation Proclamation. A bill to study reparations for slavery advanced through a House committee this year but hasn't gotten a floor vote. Karen Bleier/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Karen Bleier/AFP via Getty Images

A bill to study reparations for slavery had momentum in Congress, but still no vote

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1054889820/1055366737" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Activists have held rallies near the White House to put pressure on President Biden to do more to protect voting rights. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Voting rights activists say Democrats in Washington need to do their job

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1052487175/1052651062" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A screenshot from the forthcoming simulation and strategy game, Political Arena. Eliot Nelson hide caption

toggle caption
Eliot Nelson

In this case, politics is a (video) game

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1051381706/1052485303" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The biggest push by Democrats for action on voting rights fails in the Senate

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1047891587/1047891588" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Freedom To Vote Act is the latest fight in a bitter battle over voting rights

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1047735093/1047735094" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., led opposition among Republicans to a voting rights bill that centrist Democrat Joe Manchin of West Virginia hoped to corrall GOP votes for. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Sarah Audelo, seen during a 2016 event when she held a top role at Rock The Vote, has spent years in Democratic politics. She is stepping down from her current role as the executive director at Alliance for Youth Action to make way for younger leaders. Michael Kovac/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Kovac/Getty Images

Kristen Clarke, Assistant Attorney General for the civil rights division, speaks at a news conference at the Department of Justice on June 25 to announce that the Department of Justice would be suing the state of Georgia over it's new election laws. She urged lawmakers on Wednesday to restore protections in the landmark Voting Rights Act. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Iowa state Rep. Joe Mitchell was first elected at age 21 and is now the co-founder of an organization looking to recruit fellow young conservatives to seek public office. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Charlie Neibergall/AP

Snapchat is adding a feature to help young users run for political office

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1043017903/1043279035" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript