Juana Summers Juana Summers is a political correspondent for NPR covering race, justice and politics.
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Juana Summers

Juana Summers

Political Correspondent

Juana Summers is a political correspondent for NPR covering race, justice and politics. She has covered politics since 2010 for publications including Politico, CNN and The Associated Press. She got her start in public radio at KBIA in Columbia, Mo., and also previously covered Congress for NPR.

She appears regularly on television and radio outlets to discuss national politics. In 2016, Summers was a fellow at Georgetown University's Institute of Politics and Public Service.

She is a graduate of the Missouri School of Journalism and is originally from Kansas City, Mo.

Story Archive

How Has Kamala Harris Fared In Her First Year As Vice President?

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Young people have been on the front lines of activist movements, including on the issue of climate change. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A new look at how turmoil is defining the lives and politics of Generation Z

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President Biden and Vice President Harris will renew the administration's push for federal action to protect voting rights during a trip to Georgia on Tuesday. Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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The Supreme Court Weighs Vaccines Mandates

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Our Favorite Political Music of 2021

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Former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows has offered the most stunning revelations in the Congressional inquiry into the Jan. 6 insurrection. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

After years at the center of political power, Mark Meadows now faces legal jeopardy

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Possible charges are the latest chapter in Mark Meadows' career defined by conflict

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Rep. Lucy McBath, D-Ga., became an activist after her son Jordan was fatally shot in 2012. Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Their lives were changed by gun violence, and now they're running for office

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Survivors of gun violence are running for office, saying they bring a new perspective

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Massachusetts Rep. Ayanna Pressley is introducing legislation that would create an independent clemency board, which has been a priority of many criminal justice reform advocates. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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