Aarti Shahani Aarti Shahani is an NPR correspondent based in Silicon Valley.
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Aarti Shahani

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Aarti Shahani 2018
Nickolai Hammar/NPR

Aarti Shahani

Correspondent, Business Desk

Aarti Shahani is a correspondent for NPR. Based in Silicon Valley, she covers the biggest companies on earth. She is also an author. Her first book, Here We Are: American Dreams, American Nightmares (out Oct. 1, 2019), is about the extreme ups and downs her family encountered as immigrants in the U.S. Before journalism, Shahani was a community organizer in her native New York City, helping prisoners and families facing deportation. Even if it looks like she keeps changing careers, she's always doing the same thing: telling stories that matter.

Shahani has received awards from the Society of Professional Journalists, a regional Edward R. Murrow Award and an Investigative Reporters & Editors Award. Her activism was honored by the Union Square Awards and Legal Aid Society. She received a master's in public policy from Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, with generous support from the University and the Paul & Daisy Soros fellowship. She has a bachelor's degree from the University of Chicago. She is an alumna of A Better Chance, Inc.

Shahani grew up in Flushing, Queens — in one of the most diverse ZIP codes in the country.

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Story Archive

Employees Demand Google Publicly Commit To Not Work With ICE

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Memorial event for Member of Parliament Jo Cox, of the Labour Party. Her murder by a man radicalized on the Internet prompted Parliament to examine digital threats to lawmakers, especially women in the United Kingdom. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Trolled Online, Women In Politics Fight To Hold Big Tech Accountable In The U.K.

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The Website Where Violent White Supremacists State Their Case

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee on April 11, 2018. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Did Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Intend To Deceive?

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FTC: Facebook's Zuckerberg Must Give Progress Reports To Regulators

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As part of a settlement with the Federal Trade Commission, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg could be subject to penalties if his company doesn't comply with an agreement over privacy violations. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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Ben Margot/AP

FTC To Hold Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Liable For Any Future Privacy Violations

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Justice Department Begins Review Of Whether Big Tech Is Too Powerful

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U.S. lawmakers will question lobbyists and officials from Facebook, Google, Amazon and Apple on an array of issues. Reuters hide caption

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Reuters

'Facebook Is Dangerous': Firms In Hot Seat As Congress Probes Big Tech

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Congress' Power Struggle With Big Tech Will Be On Display At Hearings

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Trump Can't Block Twitter Followers, Federal Appeals Court Rules

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ICE Turned To DMV Driver's License Databases For Help With Facial Recognition

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A sample of the new warning notices that Twitter users will see before clicking to see tweets by government officials and political figures that violate Twitter's rules. Twitter hide caption

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Twitter

Lt. Gen. Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo is a social media personality. He's also the leader of the paramilitary group that attacked thousands of pro-democracy protesters on June 3, leaving more than a 100 dead. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

Why Facebook Won't Kick Off A Warlord

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