Aarti Shahani Aarti Shahani is a Tech Reporter on NPR's Business Desk, where she covers breaking news, and does investigative and enterprise reporting.

Aarti Shahani

Tech Reporter, NPR Business Desk

Aarti Shahani is a Tech Reporter on NPR's Business Desk. Based in Silicon Valley, it's her job to cover the biggest companies on earth. In her reporting, she works to pinpoint how economies and human relationships are being radically redefined by the tech sector.

Shahani has an unconventional path. Journalism is her second career. Before it, she was a community organizer in her native New York City, helping prisoners and families being deported from the U.S. She loves learning from brilliant, intense people — be they the engineers who are building self-driving cars, or the jailhouse lawyers filing laser-sharp habeas petitions.

Shahani received a Master in Public Policy degree from Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, with generous support from the University and the Paul & Daisy Soros fellowship. She has a bachelor's degree from the University of Chicago. Her reporting has been honored with awards from the Society of Professional Journalists, a regional Edward R. Murrow Award, and an Investigative Reporters & Editors Award.

She finds Northern California to be a beautiful and jarring place — and she hopes one day to understand its many contradictions.

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Story Archive

Facebook To Face Class Action Over Facial Recognition

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People pass by the Google logo at the Web Summit in Lisbon on Nov. 8. Europe's new data privacy rules go into effect May 25. Patricia De Melo Moreira/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patricia De Melo Moreira/AFP/Getty Images

Europe's New Online Privacy Rules Could Protect U.S. Users Too

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Facebook Says Cambridge Analytica May Have Obtained Data On As Many As 87M Users

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Shefet is part of a much larger movement in Europe pushing back against the power of the tech titans under the banner of the "right to be forgotten." Jessica Vieux for NPR hide caption

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Jessica Vieux for NPR

The Paris Lawyer Who Gives Google Nightmares

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Why A French Attorney Is On A Digital Privacy Crusade Against Tech Titans

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In Apology, Zuckerberg Promises To Protect Facebook Community

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Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg Responds To Cambridge Analytica Scandal

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Facebook Admits Data-Mining Firm Got Access To Millions Of Users' Personal Information

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Russian Bots Are Spreading False Information After The Florida Shooting

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Tech Companies Working On Fixes For Fake News As Midterms Approach

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Suspicious Spouses Monitor Partners Digitally, Divorce Lawyers Say

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According to family lawyers, scorned spouses are increasingly turning to GPS trackers and cheap spyware apps to watch an ex. Stuart Kinlough/Getty Images hide caption

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Stuart Kinlough/Getty Images

I Know Where You've Been: Digital Spying And Divorce In The Smartphone Age

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