Aarti Shahani Aarti Shahani is a Tech Reporter on NPR's Business Desk, where she covers breaking news, and does investigative and enterprise reporting.

Aarti Shahani

Tech Reporter, NPR Business Desk

Aarti Shahani is a Tech Reporter on NPR's Business Desk. Based in Silicon Valley, it's her job to cover the biggest companies on earth. In her reporting, she works to pinpoint how economies and human relationships are being radically redefined by the tech sector.

Shahani has an unconventional path. Journalism is her second career. Before it, she was a community organizer in her native New York City, helping prisoners and families being deported from the U.S. She loves learning from brilliant, intense people — be they the engineers who are building self-driving cars, or the jailhouse lawyers filing laser-sharp habeas petitions.

Shahani received a Master in Public Policy degree from Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, with generous support from the University and the Paul & Daisy Soros fellowship. She has a bachelor's degree from the University of Chicago. Her reporting has been honored with awards from the Society of Professional Journalists, a regional Edward R. Murrow Award, and an Investigative Reporters & Editors Award.

She finds Northern California to be a beautiful and jarring place — and she hopes one day to understand its many contradictions.

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Story Archive

A Lyft driver places a company emblem on his dashboard Jan. 31, in San Francisco. Lyft announced it's offering education benefits, a move aimed at recruiting and retaining drivers in its competition with Uber. Kelly Sullivan/Getty Images for Lyft hide caption

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Kelly Sullivan/Getty Images for Lyft

Under GOP Plan Tech Companies Would Receive Big Tax Breaks

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Ben Jealous was the NAACP's youngest president and one of Bernie Sanders' earliest supporters. Jealous then became a venture capitalist investing in startups. Now he is seeking office in Maryland. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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News Brief: Conyers Investigation, Uber Data Breach, Ratko Mladic

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Uber Says Hackers Stole Personal Data Of 57 Million Users

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Why Google Home Has Hard Time Recognizing The Smash Hit 'Despacito'

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How Facebook's Ads Could Change Following The Russian Debacle

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Lawmakers Grill Tech Firms On Russia's Use Of Social Media To Influence 2016 Election

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Zuckerberg Mentor Urges More Government Oversight Of Social Media

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has said connecting the world means bringing people together. But increasingly the platform is being used by some very powerful elements to sow divisions. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Zuckerberg's Big Blind Spot And The Conflict Within Facebook

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Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., (left) and Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., holds a news conference Oct. 19 to introduce legislation designed to increase the transparency of political ads on Facebook, Twitter and other social media platforms. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Facebook's Advertising Tools Complicate Efforts To Stop Russian Interference

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Facebook's Blind Spot: Connecting The World, For Better Or Worse

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Tech Companies Urge Congress To Help DREAMers

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