Avie Schneider
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Avie Schneider

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Last month, women left jobs at four times the rate that men did. A new school year with children staying home instead of returning to classrooms in person led many women to drop out of the workforce. Tom Werner/DigitalVision/Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Werner/DigitalVision/Getty Images

Enough Already: Multiple Demands Causing Women To Abandon Workforce

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U.S. stock indexes fell sharply Monday following a report that large global banks were involved in transactions flagged as possible money laundering. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

People walk near the New York Stock Exchange in June. The S&P 500 index has fully recovered from its plunge earlier this year when the pandemic began shutting down much of the economy. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos is set to testify Wednesday before a House antitrust panel along with the chiefs of Apple, Facebook and Google. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Signs are displayed outside the Washington, D.C., Department of Employment Services. New claims for unemployment benefits around the country rose for the first time in four months. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Job Picture Worsens: Millions More File For Unemployment, In Reversal

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"We still face much uncertainty regarding the future path of the economy," JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon said Tuesday in a statement accompanying the giant bank's financial results. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

'We Still Face Much Uncertainty': Pandemic Hammers Big Banks

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Pedestrians pass a New York State Department of Labor office June 11 in Queens. The Federal Reserve expects the U.S. unemployment rate to still be more than 9% by the end of 2020. Frank Franklin II/AP hide caption

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Frank Franklin II/AP

Marie Biscarra, co-owner of ISSO fashion boutique in San Francisco, writes a sign declaring her business open for curbside delivery on May 18. Retail sales jumped a record 17.7% last month. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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Ben Margot/AP

Matt Comstock (left) takes the temperature of a guest at Busch Gardens in Tampa, Fla., on Wednesday. A spike in coronavirus cases in Florida and other states raised concerns in financial markets. Chris O'Meara/AP hide caption

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Chris O'Meara/AP

The job market continues to suffer even as much of the country is gradually reopening after coronavirus shutdowns. Alastair Pike/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alastair Pike/AFP via Getty Images

Amazon is offering permanent jobs for 125,000 workers it hired to deal with a sharp rise in online shopping during the coronavirus pandemic. Ina Fassbender/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ina Fassbender/AFP via Getty Images