Avie Schneider
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Avie Schneider

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A man looks at a memorial Tuesday with pictures of some of the missing from the partially collapsed 12-story Champlain Towers South condo building in Surfside, Fla. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

As South Florida Grieves Condo Victims, Miami Beach Cancels Its July 4th Celebrations

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Moises Soffer, a volunteer member of Cadena International's search-and-rescue team working at the site of the condo building collapse, holds a trained search dog named Oreo in Surfside, Fla., on Sunday. Gianrigo Marletta/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Gianrigo Marletta/AFP via Getty Images

Rescue Teams Hold Out Hope Of Finding Survivors In Florida Condo Collapse

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Participants sit a Blue Origin space simulator during a conference on robotics and artificial intelligence in Las Vegas on June 5, 2019. On Saturday, Blue Origin announced that an unidentified bidder will pay $28 million for a suborbital flight on the company's New Shepard vehicle. Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images

Dr. Anne Schuchat, principal deputy director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, testifies before a House panel on Sept. 25, 2019. In an NPR interview, she says the nation has more work to do to get ready for a future pandemic. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

The CDC's No. 2 Official Says The U.S. Isn't Ready For Another Pandemic

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A Nordstrom store is looking for employees last month in Coral Gables, Fla. Citing a severe shortage of workers, half of the nation's governors have decided to end extra federal jobless benefits months early. Marta Lavandier/AP hide caption

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Marta Lavandier/AP

Half Of States Are Ending Pandemic Jobless Aid Early, And The Economy Could Suffer

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A laboratory on the campus of the Wuhan Institute of Virology in Wuhan in China's central Hubei province in May 2020. Focus has turned back to the facility as a possible origin of the coronavirus pandemic. Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images

Why The U.S. Thinks A Lab In Wuhan Needs A Closer Look As A Possible Pandemic Source

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As people get back to in-person work, it may be a difficult transition for dogs and their owners. One tip from a veterinarian: Don't make a big deal about leaving and coming back home. Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

6 Tips For Getting Your Dog Ready For Your Return To The Office

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A gas pump is marked "out of service" as cars line up May 11 at a Circle K in Charlotte, N.C., following a ransomware attack that shut down Colonial Pipeline. Logan Cyrus/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Logan Cyrus/AFP via Getty Images

Pipeline Companies Will Have To Report Cyberattacks To The Government

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Bees are seen on a honeycomb cell at the BEE Lab hives at the University of Sydney on May 18, 2021. The U.N. has designated May 20 as World Bee Day. Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images hide caption

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Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images

Why You Should Celebrate World Bee Day Today

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Young Palestinians inspect the damage an Israeli attack inflicted on houses in the Sabra neighborhood of Gaza City. A man who lives in the middle of the Gaza Strip says his family is traumatized by the violence. Mustafa Hassona/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Mustafa Hassona/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Families Say The Gaza Violence Is Taking An Immense Mental Toll On Their Kids

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Speaking to reporters on April 27 in Elizabeth City, N.C., Wayne Kendall, one of the lawyers representing the family of Andrew Brown Jr., points to an autopsy chart showing where Brown was shot. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Andrew Brown Jr. Did Not Use Vehicle As A Weapon Against Deputies, Attorney Says

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Israeli artillery fires toward the Gaza Strip from a position at the Israeli-Gaza border near Sderot on Wednesday. Ilia Yefimovich/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Ilia Yefimovich/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images

Covid Inc. in Tempe, Ariz., has been selling audiovisual equipment for decades. CEO Norm Carson says people sometimes come in to the building looking for a COVID-19 test. Kevin Myles hide caption

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Kevin Myles

When Your Company Is Named Covid, You've Heard All The Jokes

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A 16-year-old gets a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine in Anaheim, Calif., on April 28. Advisers to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now say it's not necessary for adolescents to wait two weeks after a COVID shot to receive routine immunizations. Paul Bersebach/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Bersebach/MediaNews Group via Getty Images

Adolescents Can Get Routine Immunizations With Their COVID Shots, CDC Advisers Say

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