Becky Sullivan Becky Sullivan is a producer for All Things Considered.
Becky Sullivan
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Becky Sullivan

Becky Sullivan/NPR
Becky Sullivan
Becky Sullivan/NPR

Becky Sullivan

Producer, All Things Considered

Becky Sullivan has been a producer for NPR since 2011. She is one of the network's go-to breaking news producers and has been on the ground for many major news stories of the past several years. She traveled to Tehran for the funeral of Iranian military leader Qassem Soleimani, to Colombia to cover the Zika virus, to Afghanistan for the anniversary of Sept. 11 and to Pyongyang to report on the regime of Kim Jong-Un. She's also reported from around the U.S., including Hurricane Michael in Florida and the mass shooting in San Bernardino.

In her role with All Things Considered, Sullivan is regularly the lead broadcast producer, and she produces a wide variety of newsmaker interviews, including members of Congress, presidential candidates and a sheriff trying to limit the coronavirus outbreak in meatpacking plants in Iowa. Sullivan led NPR's election night coverage for the 2018 midterms, multiple State of the Union addresses and other special and breaking news coverage. A native Kansas Citian, Sullivan also regularly brings coverage of the Midwest and Great Plains region to NPR.

Before joining NPR, Sullivan worked at WNYC in New York and Kansas Public Radio in Lawrence, Kan. She is a graduate of the University of Kansas.

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Story Archive

Laurie Robinson, left, professor of criminology at George Mason University, and Charles Ramsey, right, Philadelphia police commissioner, listen while President Obama discusses law enforcement recommendations from his Task Force on 21st Century Policing in March 2015. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

How Recommendations Of An Obama Task Force Have, And Haven't, Changed U.S. Policing

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Mayor Quinton Lucas talks to demonstrators during a rally in Kansas City, Mo., on June 5, to protest the death of George Floyd. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

Mayor Of Kansas City, Mo., Wants To Eliminate Marijuana Offenses

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Looking west from this overlook in the George Washington National Forest in central Virginia, the pathway of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline would be visible along the valley floor running to the north. Becky Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Sullivan/NPR

Breonna Taylor, here in December, would have turned 27 on Friday. Her friends and family remember Taylor as a caring person who loved her job in health care and enjoyed playing cards with her aunts. Taylor Family hide caption

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Taylor Family

As The Nation Chants Her Name, Breonna Taylor's Family Grieves A Life 'Robbed'

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David McAtee is remembered as a "community pillar" and the owner of Yaya's BBQ in Louisville. He was killed Monday when police and National Guard shot him at his business while dispersing protesters. Walt & Shae Smith hide caption

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Walt & Shae Smith

The Louisville Community Who Loved David McAtee Has Questions About His Death

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Vehicles sit in a near empty parking lot outside the Tyson Foods plant in Waterloo, Iowa, on May 1. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Tyson's Largest Pork Plant Reopens As Tests Show Surge In Coronavirus Cases

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Rocio Tirado, who works for a New Orleans area newspaper, has seen her pay drop during the pandemic. She asked her sons Nicholas (left) and Emilio to be less wasteful. Rocio Tirado hide caption

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Rocio Tirado

Scott Severs and his wife, Julie Bartlett, have been able to pay their mortgage and they have a healthy emergency fund. He donated his federal rescue check but acknowledges not everyone can. Courtesy of Scott Severs hide caption

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Courtesy of Scott Severs

Andrew Downs, senior regional director for the southern region of the Appalachian Trail Conservancy, stands at the approximate spot where the pipeline would cross underground. Becky Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Sullivan/NPR

Supreme Court Pipeline Fight Could Disrupt How The Appalachian Trail Is Run

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During a funeral procession at Revolution Square in Tehran on Monday, crowds surround the coffins of Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani and others killed in Iraq by a U.S. drone strike. Ebrahim Noroozi/AP hide caption

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Ebrahim Noroozi/AP

Joseph Maguire has been acting director of national intelligence since August — the longest the position has remained unfilled since its 2004 creation, which was prompted by the attacks of Sept. 11. Brendan Smialowski /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski /AFP/Getty Images

4 Months And Counting, An Acting Intelligence Chief In The Hot Seat

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Shelly and Sam Summers stand with daughter Gabby in front of a makeshift shelter on their rural Bay County property. They opened their backyard to people who were homeless after Hurricane Michael. At the peak, about 50 people lived there. Now, there are 18. "We still have our home," Shelly says. "They have nothing. So if we can at least offer them the comforts of home, it was worth it." William Widmer for NPR hide caption

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William Widmer for NPR

Nearly 8 Months After Hurricane Michael, Florida Panhandle Feels Left Behind

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At Lynn's Quality Oysters in Eastpoint, Fla., employees are starting to clean up and take stock of the damage after devastating storm surge hit the area. Becky Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Sullivan/NPR

Goose-stepping soldiers mark the beginning of a massive torchlight parade to commemorate the 1948 founding of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. David Guttenfelder for NPR hide caption

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David Guttenfelder for NPR

Kim Jong Un Says He's Building North Korea's Economy; It's Hard To Assess Progress

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