Becky Sullivan Becky Sullivan is a producer for All Things Considered.
Becky Sullivan
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Becky Sullivan

Becky Sullivan/NPR
Becky Sullivan
Becky Sullivan/NPR

Becky Sullivan

Reporter, News Desk

Becky Sullivan has reported and produced for NPR since 2011 with a focus on hard news and breaking stories. She has been on the ground to cover natural disasters, disease outbreaks, elections and protests, delivering stories to both broadcast and digital platforms.

In January 2020, she traveled to Tehran to help cover the assassination and funeral of Iranian military leader Qassem Soleimani, work that made NPR a Pulitzer finalist that year. Her work covering the death of Breonna Taylor won an Edward R. Murrow Award for Hard News.

Sullivan has spoken to armed service members in Afghanistan on the anniversary of Sept. 11, reported from a military parade in Pyongyang for coverage of the regime of Kim Jong-Un, visited hospitals and pregnancy clinics in Colombia to cover the outbreak of Zika and traveled Haiti to report on the aftermath of natural disasters. She's also reported from around the U.S., including Hurricane Michael in Florida and the mass shooting in San Bernardino.

She previously worked as a producer for All Things Considered, where she regularly led the broadcast and produced high-profile newsmaker interviews. Sullivan led NPR's special coverage of the 2018 midterm elections, multiple State of the Union addresses and other special and breaking news coverage.

Originally a Kansas Citian, Sullivan also regularly brings coverage of the Midwest and Great Plains region to NPR.

Story Archive

Cleveland Browns quarterback Deshaun Watson, who has been accused of sexual misconduct, participates in Friday's preseason game against the Jacksonville Jaguars. Fans booed him at TIAA Bank Field. Mike Carlson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Carlson/Getty Images

Participants in an interfaith memorial ceremony enter the New Mexico Islamic Center mosque to commemorate four murdered Muslim men, hours after police said they had arrested a prime suspect in the killings, in Albuquerque, N.M., on Tuesday. Andrew Hay/Reuters hide caption

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Andrew Hay/Reuters

Local law enforcement officers are seen in front of the home of former President Donald Trump at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla., on Tuesday. Giorgio Viera/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Giorgio Viera/AFP via Getty Images

Supporters of a constitutional amendment about abortion in Kansas remove signs ahead of Tuesday's vote. Kyle Rivas/Getty Images hide caption

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Kyle Rivas/Getty Images

Encore: Sprite ditches its iconic green bottle, but critics say it's not enough

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Sen. Joe Manchin, Democrat of West Virginia, speaks to reporters about the compromise bill that could substantially alter a tax provision called the "carried interest loophole." Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

On left, the classic green Sprite bottle. On the right, the new clear bottle. Alex Tai/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images; The Coca-Cola Co. hide caption

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Alex Tai/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images; The Coca-Cola Co.

Sprite ditches its iconic green bottle — but environmentalists say it's not enough

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Dr. Caitlin Bernard, the Indiana doctor who provided an abortion to a 10-year-old rape victim from Ohio, speaks during an abortion rights rally in June at the Indiana Statehouse. Jenna Watson/IndyStar/USA TODAY Network/Reuters hide caption

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Jenna Watson/IndyStar/USA TODAY Network/Reuters

Indiana doctor says she has been harassed for giving an abortion to a 10-year-old

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After receiving their white doctor's coats, dozens of incoming medical students at the University of Michigan walked out in protest of a keynote speaker with anti-abortion beliefs. Screenshot by NPR; Video: Brendan Scorpio hide caption

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Screenshot by NPR; Video: Brendan Scorpio

A medical laboratory technician shows a suspected monkeypox sample at the microbiology laboratory of La Paz Hospital on June 6. Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images hide caption

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Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images

In April, Indianapolis leaders and legal representatives announced a set of coordinated lawsuits against a delinquent landlord, JPC Affordable Housing Foundation, which has failed to pay $1.7 million in water bills at four apartment complexes. The utility company now says it plans to shut off service Sept. 30 if an agreement can't be reached. Jill Sheridan/WFYI hide caption

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Jill Sheridan/WFYI

Abortion rights protesters gather at the Texas state capitol in Austin in June. Suzanne Cordeiro/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Suzanne Cordeiro/AFP via Getty Images

Firefighters remove rubble following a Russian airstrike in the central city of Vinnytsia on Thursday that Ukrainian officials said killed more than 20 people and injured dozens more. Sergei Supinsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sergei Supinsky/AFP via Getty Images

A Russian strike on a humanitarian hub is part of a pattern, Ukrainian officials say

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