Brakkton Booker Brakkton Booker is a producer/reporter for NPR's political unit.
Meg Kelly/NPR
Brakkton Booker 2016
Meg Kelly/NPR

Brakkton Booker

Producer, Washington Desk

Brakkton Booker is a producer/reporter for NPR's political unit. He has spent most of the 2016 presidential cycle covering the race for the GOP nomination.

When he's not on the campaign trail, Booker produces pieces from the White House, Capitol Hill, the Supreme Court and other federal agencies for NPR News magazines including Morning Edition and All Things Considered. He previously served as the network's lead producer from the Louisville campaign headquarters of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in 2014. Booker served in a similar capacity during the 2012 presidential campaign producing pieces from the Republican and Democratic National conventions as well as from President Obama's reelection site in Chicago.

In the summer of 2014, Booker took a break from the politics grind to report on the unrest in Ferguson, Missouri.

Booker earned a bachelor's degree from Howard University and is was a 2015 Kiplinger Fellow. When he's not working he enjoys discovering new brands of whiskey and playing golf.

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Story Archive

Protesters Descend On D.C., Urging Lawmakers To Vote Against Kavanaugh

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How The Legal Community Is Reacting To The Planned Senate Vote On Kavanaugh

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In North Carolina, Florence Fatigue Sets In

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Florence Deluge Continues In North Carolina

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In Hurricane Florence Aftermath, The Luxury Of A Hot Meal

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Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kan., chairman of the Senate Agriculture Committee, left, speaks with Ranking Member Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., during a meeting of the committee in June, to consider a bipartisan farm bill. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Gaming Industry Shocked After Deadly Shooting At Jacksonville Tournament

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John McCain is escorted by Lt. Cmdr. Jay Coupe Jr. to Hanoi's Gia Lam Airport on March 14, 1973, after 5 1/2 years as a prisoner of war. Horst Faas/AP hide caption

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Horst Faas/AP

From A POW Prison, John McCain Emerged A 'Maverick'

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Justin Filipowski (left) and Peter Curtis, dressed in 18th-century post-Colonial costume, harvest hemp at Mount Vernon, George Washington's historic plantation. It is the first hemp crop harvest on this Founding Father's estate in decades, maybe centuries. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

After Centuries, Hemp Makes A Comeback At George Washington's Home

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Hemp Industry Turns To George Washington For Help With Its Image

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Ben Carson, the Housing and Urban Development secretary, said the Obama-era Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing rule "impeded the development and rehabilitation of affordable housing." Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Southerland says she dreams about buying a home in Bolton Hill, where it's quiet and culturally diverse. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

In Baltimore, The Gap Between White And Black Homeownership Persists

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