Brakkton Booker Brakkton Booker is a reporter for NPR's National Desk.
Brakkton Booker at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Brakkton Booker

Allison Shelley/NPR
Brakkton Booker at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Brakkton Booker

Reporter, National Desk

Brakkton Booker is a National Desk reporter based in Washington, DC.

He covers a wide range of topics including issues related to federal social safety net programs and news around the mid-Atlantic region of the United States.

His reporting takes him across the country covering natural disasters, like hurricanes and flooding, as well as tracking trends in regional politics and in state governments, particularly on issues of race.

Following the 2018 mass shooting in Parkland, Florida, Booker's reporting broadened to include a focus on young activists pushing for changes to federal and state gun laws, including the March For Our Lives rally and national school walkouts.

Prior to joining NPR's national desk, Booker spent five years as a producer/reporter for NPR's political unit. He spent most to the 2016 presidential campaign cycle covering the contest for the GOP nomination and was the lead producer from the Trump campaign headquarters on election night. Booker served in a similar capacity from the Louisville campaign headquarters of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in 2014. During the 2012 presidential campaign, he produced pieces and filed dispatches from the Republican and Democratic National conventions, as well as from President Obama's reelection site in Chicago.

In the summer of 2014, Booker took a break from politics to report on the unrest in Ferguson, Missouri.

Booker started his career as a show producer working on nearly all of NPR's magazine programs, including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and former news and talk show Tell Me More, where he produced the program's signature Barbershop segment.

He earned a bachelor's degree from Howard University and was a 2015 Kiplinger Fellow. When he's not on the road, Booker enjoys discovering new brands of whiskey and working on his golf game.

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Elizabeth Williams/AP

Federal prosecutors announced charges of sex trafficking against wealthy financier Jeffrey Epstein last week. He is seen here in 2005. Patrick McMullan/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Acosta said Friday he is stepping down as labor secretary so his handling of a 2008 prosecution of Jeffrey Epstein won't distract from the U.S. economy's "amazing" performance. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Philip Smith is the president and founder of the National African American Gun Association. Since its creation in 2015, the group has seen rapid growth with roughly 30,000 members and 75 chapters nationwide. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

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Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR

With A Growing Membership Since Trump, Black Gun Group Considers Getting Political

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Knox Williams, the president and executive director of American Suppressor Association, and Josh Savani, the director of research and information office at the NRA Institute for Legislative Action, explain, what they say, are the benefits of using firearm suppressors. Shuran Huang/NPR hide caption

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The Gun Industry Pushes Back On Call To Ban Suppressors In Virginia

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California Rep. Adam Schiff speaks at a news conference as Rep. Jason Crow of Colorado (from left), Rept. Debbie Mucarsel-Powell of Florida, Sen. Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut and Rep. Dwight Evans of Pennsylvania look on. The Democratic leaders introduced the Equal Access to Justice for Victims of Gun Violence Act on Tuesday. Brakkton Booker/NPR hide caption

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Vigils Continue For 12 People Killed In Virginia Beach Shooting

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Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have launched a free online gun violence prevention course. Elizabeth Fernandez/Getty Images hide caption

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Free Gun Violence Prevention Course Launches To Educate Young Activists

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Christopher Darden, (left), is seen in Los Angeles County Superior Court with his now former client Eric Holder. Holder is accused of killing rapper Nipsey Hussle in March. Patrick T. Fallon/AP hide caption

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Americans Siding With Maduro Confront Venezuelan Guaidó Supporters At D.C. Embassy

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Mayor Catherine Pugh offers background on her Healthy Holly book business during a City Hall news conference in March. Amy Davis/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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A public service announcement released by anti-gun violence group, March For Our Lives, features adults learning what to do should an active shooting incident take place at their job. March For Our Lives via Youtube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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March For Our Lives via Youtube/Screenshot by NPR

Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh, under investigation in connection with lucrative sales of her children's book, was the subject of a federal raid Thursday morning. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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