Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.
Camila Domonoske square 2017
Stories By

Camila Domonoske

Brandon Carter/NPR
Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Reporter

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race. For NPR's Two-Way Blog/News Desk, she covered breaking news on all topics.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She was a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime" and co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Boeing 737 Max jets are grounded at Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix on March 14. Matt York/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matt York/AP

Boeing Brings 100 Years Of History To Its Fight To Restore Its Reputation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/705068061/705252859" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Norwegian Air Boeing 737 Max 8 is parked on the tarmac at Helsinki Airport on Wednesday after the airplane model was grounded in most of the world. Lehtikuva/Heikki Saukkomaa/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Lehtikuva/Heikki Saukkomaa/Reuters

For Boeing, Costs Of Grounding Jets Have Only Just Begun

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/703189895/703287567" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Will Join Other Nations In Removing Boeing 737 Max 8 Jets From Service

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/703162340/703162341" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Electric scooters are pictured on a sidewalk in Paris in June 2018. Multiple companies offer the small vehicles for rent by the minute in cities around the world, including many in the U.S. Christophe Archambault/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Christophe Archambault/AFP/Getty Images

Who Charges All Those Electric Scooters? Follow A Nocturnal 'Juicer'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/701130673/702908804" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

How Boeing Is Dealing With The Aftermath Of Ethiopian Airlines Crash

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/702355671/702355677" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Volvo said it will limit all its new cars to a top speed of about 112 mph, starting in 2020. Here, workers on Feb. 6 prepare the Volvo display before the opening of the Chicago Auto Show. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Most American cars run on gasoline. But analysts say that's poised to change as electric vehicles take over the market, although they disagree on how soon. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

As More Electric Cars Arrive, What's The Future For Gas-Powered Engines?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/694303169/695420301" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Harley-Davidson LiveWire, launching in August, is the American manufacturer's first electric motorcycle. Josh Kurpius/Harley-Davidson hide caption

toggle caption
Josh Kurpius/Harley-Davidson

Harley-Davidson Embraces A New Sound As It Enters The Electric Era

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/693679858/694463861" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Even after massively increasing production of the Model 3, Tesla still hasn't managed to offer the car at its touted price of $35,000. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David Zalubowski/AP

Tesla's Challenge: Leaving Behind The Lap Of Luxury

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/688180319/690230762" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Venezuela's State-Owned Oil Company Is Hit With U.S. Sanctions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/689587279/689587280" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Toyota demonstrates its "pre-collision system," which uses automatic steering in addition to automatic braking to prevent collisions, in Tokyo in 2013. Different manufacturers use different names for systems like this, which can be confusing, a AAA report found. Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images

A man stands outside a Tesla dealership in Berlin on Jan. 4. On Friday, Tesla announced it would lay off 7 percent of its workforce, cutting some 3,000 jobs. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Motorists drive past a sign advertising regular gasoline at $1.88 per gallon at a station in Longmont, Colo., on Dec. 22, 2018. Falling gasoline prices have given drivers a little extra cheer this winter. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David Zalubowski/AP

What's Driving Low Gas Prices? A Global Oil Glut

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/685826699/686451035" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People at the Ford display at the Essen Motor Show fair in Essen, Germany, in December 2017. The automaker has announced it will be cutting some jobs in Europe to reduce costs. Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen looks at her papers while testifying before members of the House Judiciary Committee on Thursday in Washington, D.C. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Wilson/Getty Images