Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.
Camila Domonoske square 2017
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Camila Domonoske

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Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Correspondent

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She covers the automotive supply chain, reporting from the salt piles of an active lithium mine and the floor of a vehicle assembly plant. She reports on what cars mean to the daily lives of the American public — whether they're buying cars, maintaining cars or walking and biking on streets dominated by cars. And she is closely tracking the automotive industry's transformative shift toward zero-emission vehicles.

She monitors the gyrations of global energy markets, explaining why price movements are happening and what it means for the world. She tracks the profits and investments of some of the world's largest energy producers. As global urgency around climate change mounts, she has reported on how companies are — and are not — responding to calls for a rapid energy transition. She has reported on why a country that is remarkably vulnerable to climate change would embrace oil production, and why investors, for reasons unrelated to climate change, have pushed companies to curb their output.

Before she joined the business desk, Domonoske was a general assignment reporter and a web producer for NPR. She has covered hurricanes and elections, walruses and circuses. She has written about language, race, gender and history. In a career highlight, she helped NPR win a pie-eating contest in the summer of 2018.

Domonoske graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina, where she majored in English, with a focus on modern poetry.

Story Archive

Tuesday

Orphan well hunting

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Tuesday

China is aiming to become a global automotive powerhouse, particularly when it comes to electric vehicles. Here, cars wait to be loaded onto a ship at a port in Nanjing. STR/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP via Getty Images

5 takeaways from Biden's tariff hikes on Chinese electric vehicles

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President Joe Biden drives a Cadillac Lyriq through the showroom during a tour at the Detroit Auto Show, Sept. 14, 2022, in Detroit. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Thursday

Tenke Fungurume Mine, one of the largest copper and cobalt mines in the world, is owned by Chinese company CMOC, in southeastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Minerals like cobalt are important components of electric vehicle batteries, but mines that produce them can hurt the environment and people nearby. Emmet Livingstone/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Emmet Livingstone/AFP via Getty Images

Their batteries hurt the environment, but EVs still beat gas cars. Here's why

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Monday

BYD electric cars wait to be loaded onto a ship at a port in Yantai, China, on April 18. China has rapidly become a major auto exporter, but tariffs have kept cheap Chinese EVs out of the U.S. market — so far. STR/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP via Getty Images

China makes cheap electric vehicles. Why can't American shoppers buy them?

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Thursday

Tesla hit an unexpected team with hundreds of layoffs

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High tariffs are keeping affordable Chinese-made EVs out of the U.S. for now

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Monday

This could be the impact if China's affordable EVs were sold in the U.S.

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Tuesday

With his son in one arm, Tesla CEO Elon Musk waves while visiting the Tesla Gigafactory in Germany in March. Ebrahim Noroozi/AP hide caption

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Ebrahim Noroozi/AP

Friday

Monday

What good is an EV if you can't charge it? Here's the plan to build more chargers

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Tuesday

The economic impact of the Baltimore bridge collapse

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Monday

Sea levels in Guyana are rising several times faster than the global average. High tides sometimes spill over the seawall that is meant to protect the coastline. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Saturday

Car imports could slow with Port of Baltimore closures

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Friday

Thursday

Cars exit from the Baltimore Port after the cargo ship Dali ran into and collapsed the Francis Scott Key Bridge in Baltimore, Md., on Tuesday. Two people were pulled alive from the water, two bodies were recovered and four people were presumed dead. The men were working on the bridge at the time of the collision at 1:30 a.m. Kena Betancur/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/Getty Images

Tuesday

Cars are visible in a general view from the Baltimore Port after the cargo ship Dali ran into and collapsed the Francis Scott Key Bridge in Baltimore, Md., on Tuesday. The accident has temporarily closed the Port of Baltimore, which handles more vehicles per year than any other U.S. port. Kena Betancur/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/Getty Images

Sunday

The EPA's new rules point to EVs being the future — but consumers have their doubts

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Thursday

New vehicle emission rules are meant to quicken the change to electric vehicles

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Wednesday

Morning traffic fills the SR2 freeway in Los Angeles, California. The EPA released new rules for vehicle emissions that are expected to cut tailpipe pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, which are fueling climate change. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

In a boost for EVs, EPA finalizes strict new limits on tailpipe emissions

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Thursday

Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

You asked, we answered: Your questions about electric vehicles

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Friday

It's "Vehicle Safety Recalls Week," an initiative by federal regulators to encourage drivers to check if their car has been recalled during the two days a year when clocks in the U.S. change. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

It's time to move your clocks forward — and to check if your car is being recalled

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Saturday

How well do EVs handle cold weather?

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Friday

Tesla CEO Elon Musk speaks at a conference in Paris on June 16, 2023. Musk's record compensation package as Tesla CEO was recently rejected by a court as excessive, in a decision that pivoted in part on how much sway Musk has over his company. Alain Jocard/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alain Jocard/AFP via Getty Images

Elon Musk is synonymous with Tesla. Is that good or bad for shareholders?

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