Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.
Brandon Carter/NPR
Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Reporter

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

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Story Archive

Pakistani supporters of ousted Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif carry posters and banners outside the high court building in Islamabad on Wednesday as they celebrate his release from prison. Sharif is appealing the conviction, which followed a major corruption scandal. Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images

An empty pedestal remains where a statue known as Early Days, which depicted a Native American at the feet of a Catholic missionary and Spanish cowboy, used to stand on Fulton Street in San Francisco. The statue was removed early Friday morning. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Firefighters battle a house fire in North Andover, Mass., one of a series of fires and explosions on Thursday thought to have been triggered by a gas line that feeds several communities north of Boston. Mary Schwalm/AP hide caption

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Mary Schwalm/AP

Dr. Leana Wen, health commissioner for the Baltimore City Health Department, talks about the effectiveness of contraception for public school students in 2015. Wen will be the new head of Planned Parenthood Federation of America. Kim Hairston/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Kim Hairston/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

President Trump, Vice President Pence and first lady Melania Trump visit the Federal Emergency Management Agency headquarters in Washington, D.C., on June 6. Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen and FEMA Administrator Brock Long are seated at right. This summer, DHS transferred nearly $10 million from FEMA to immigration authorities, according to a congressional document. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Marcus Thurston and his family leave their hotel in Myrtle Beach, S.C., on Tuesday, cutting their vacation short ahead of Hurricane Florence's arrival. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Solar panels are mounted on the roof of the Los Angeles Convention Center on September 5. The state's governor has signed a landmark bill setting a goal of 100 percent clean energy for the state's electrical needs, by the year 2045. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

The Ford Focus Active, a small crossover car currently sold in Europe, was slated to begin production in China for the U.S. market. Ford canceled those plans, citing tariffs imposed by the Trump administration. Ford Motor Company hide caption

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Ford Motor Company

Bob Woodward speaks at the Newseum in Washington, D.C., in 2012, during an event marking the 40th anniversary of Watergate. Woodward's new book describes chaos within the Trump administration. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Bob Woodward: 'Great Washington Denial Machine' Driven By Politics, Not Truth

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Debbie Van Horn was arrested Thursday at Houston's George Bush Intercontinental Airport and booked into the Walker County Jail on Thursday. Walker County Jail via Reuters hide caption

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Walker County Jail via Reuters

Acting New York state Attorney General Barbara D. Underwood (left) speaks in Albany, N.Y. on May 15. New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir Grewal speaks during a news conference on Aug. 1 in Newark, N.J. Hans Pennink and Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Hans Pennink and Julio Cortez/AP

Former Blackwater Worldwide guard Nicholas Slatten leaves federal court in Washington, D.C., in June 2014. Slatten was found guilty for his role in a deadly Baghdad shooting, but his conviction was overturned. On Wednesday, his retrial ended with a hung jury. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP