Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.
Brandon Carter/NPR
Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Reporter

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

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Story Archive

Mexico's presidential plane, a Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner called the Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon, arrives at Benito Juarez International Airport in Mexico City in February 2016, when it was brand new. The airplane was one of the most expensive presidential airplanes in the world. Mexico's next president is trying to sell it. Hector Vivas/LatinContent/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Vivas/LatinContent/Getty Images

Rohingya Hindu refugees stand outside their makeshift shelters at the Kutupalong refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, in January. Bangladesh and Myanmar plan to begin the repatriation of hundreds of thousands of Rohingya Muslim refugees who fled from violence in Myanmar. Manish Swarup/AP hide caption

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Manish Swarup/AP

A strawberry is shown on a fork at a restaurant in Sydney in September. The tainting of supermarket strawberries with sewing needles prompted a scare across Australia; now, a farm supervisor is facing charges. Saeed Khan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saeed Khan/AFP/Getty Images

Then-New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman speaks at a news conference on Jan. 30. Schneiderman resigned after multiple women accused him of physical abuse; a prosecutor announced Thursday that Schneiderman will not be facing criminal charges in connection with the case. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Emile Ratelband, a 69-year-old Dutch man, says having a younger age on paper would give him a boost in life and on dating apps. Roland Heitink/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Roland Heitink/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg arrives at a lecture on Sept. 26 at Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, D.C. Ginsburg has been hospitalized after falling and fracturing several ribs. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

More than 47 percent of the voting-eligible population cast a ballot in the midterm elections on Tuesday according to early estimates from the United States Election Project. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Voters elected the country's first Muslim congresswomen, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota (left) and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan, both Democrats. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images; Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Stephen Maturen/Getty Images; Paul Sancya/AP

The U.S. Supreme Court has been asked to intervene in pending cases about the legality of the Trump administration's decision to end the DACA program. Eric Thayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Thayer/Getty Images

Families of victims of Lion Air Flight JT610 attend a meeting with authorities and Lion Air management on Monday in Jakarta, Indonesia. All 189 passengers and crew are feared to have died when the plane crashed shortly after takeoff on Oct. 29. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images hide caption

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Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images

Sara Murawski, pictured on the patio of her new condo in Portland, Ore., has been dreaming of homeownership for two decades. This year, she became a first-time homebuyer — seeing first hand how Portland's red-hot housing market is starting to cool and become a little friendlier to buyers. Courtesy of Justin Dias hide caption

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Courtesy of Justin Dias

New Homebuyers Face A Friendlier Housing Market, Thanks To Cooldown

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In dueling lawsuits, Match, which owns Tinder, alleges that Bumble infringed on Tinder's intellectual property — while Bumble says that argument is bogus. Cameron Pollack/NPR hide caption

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Cameron Pollack/NPR

The Tinder-Bumble Feud: Dating Apps Fight Over Who Owns The Swipe

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