Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.
Camila Domonoske square 2017
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Camila Domonoske

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Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Correspondent

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She covers the automotive supply chain, reporting from the salt piles of an active lithium mine and the floor of a vehicle assembly plant. She reports on what cars mean to the daily lives of the American public — whether they're buying cars, maintaining cars or walking and biking on streets dominated by cars. And she is closely tracking the automotive industry's transformative shift toward zero-emission vehicles.

She monitors the gyrations of global energy markets, explaining why price movements are happening and what it means for the world. She tracks the profits and investments of some of the world's largest energy producers. As global urgency around climate change mounts, she has reported on how companies are — and are not — responding to calls for a rapid energy transition. She has reported on why a country that is remarkably vulnerable to climate change would embrace oil production, and why investors, for reasons unrelated to climate change, have pushed companies to curb their output.

Before she joined the business desk, Domonoske was a general assignment reporter and a web producer for NPR. She has covered hurricanes and elections, walruses and circuses. She has written about language, race, gender and history. In a career highlight, she helped NPR win a pie-eating contest in the summer of 2018.

Domonoske graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina, where she majored in English, with a focus on modern poetry.

Story Archive

Saturday

How well do EVs handle cold weather?

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Friday

Tesla CEO Elon Musk speaks at a conference in Paris on June 16, 2023. Musk's record compensation package as Tesla CEO was recently rejected by a court as excessive, in a decision that pivoted in part on how much sway Musk has over his company. Alain Jocard/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alain Jocard/AFP via Getty Images

Elon Musk is synonymous with Tesla. Is that good or bad for shareholders?

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Wednesday

Electric F-150 Lightning pickup trucks travel down the production line at Ford's Rouge Electric Vehicle Center in Dearborn, Michigan on September 8, 2022. Ford has cut two shifts at the plant as it reduces production of the Lightning. But this week Ford CEO Jim Farley told investors "the journey on EVs is inevitable, in our eyes." Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

Wednesday

The journey toward electric vehicles has hit a rough patch. Sales are cooling off

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Tuesday

Toyota issues do-not-drive order for some older cars over defective airbags

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Thursday

Cruise autonomous vehicles sit parked in a lot in June 2023 in San Francisco, Calif. The company's fleet of robotaxis have not been operating for the past few months, after the company's response to a crash in October raised concerns with regulators. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Thursday

Oil production companies in the U.S. keep consolidating

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Saturday

An aerial view of Consumer Reports' testing track in Connecticut. Consumer Reports hide caption

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Consumer Reports

As the auto industry pivots to EVs, product tester Consumer Reports learns to adjust

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Thursday

Thursday

A $7,500 tax credit for electric vehicles has seen substantial changes in 2024. It should be easier to get because it's now available as an instant rebate at dealerships, but fewer models qualify. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The $7,500 tax credit for electric cars has some big changes in 2024. What to know

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Wednesday

Shovels and an excavator are visible at the groundbreaking celebration for the Stratos direct air capture plant in West Texas on April 28. Construction began on the site in late 2022, and it's slated to begin operations in 2025. Camila Domonoske/NPR hide caption

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Camila Domonoske/NPR

This oil company invests in pulling CO2 out of the sky — so it can keep selling crude

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Friday

Getting a tax credit for buying a new electric vehicle will soon be simpler

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Saturday

Consumer Reports is adapting its automobile testing to include EVs

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Tuesday

An oil pump jack stands near a field of wind turbines in Nolan, Texas, on Oct. 4. Oil companies are under pressure to pivot more swiftly toward renewable energy. Here's one reason why that's not happening so quickly: It's still incredibly lucrative to sell oil. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Making oil is more profitable than saving the planet. These numbers tell the story

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Monday

Oil companies are reluctant to give up the big profits that fossil fuels bring them

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Tuesday

ExxonMobil CEO, Darren Woods, speaks at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Leaders' Week in San Francisco on Nov. 15, 2023. Oil companies have a big platform at the ongoing COP28 climate conference in Dubai, and experts say their language is important because it can make it into policy. Woods, for example, attended COP28, the first time an ExxonMobil CEO has gone to the gathering. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Oil companies are embracing terms like 'lower carbon.' Here's what they really mean

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Monday

What the fossil fuel industry is saying in this year's climate talks

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Thursday

United Auto Workers President Shawn Fain posed with UAW members as they strike the General Motors Lansing Delta Assembly Plant in Michigan in late September. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

Big 3 autoworkers vote 'yes' to historic UAW contracts

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Monday

UAW's new contract helps other car companies' workers — but what about Tesla?

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Sunday

UAW members attend a solidarity rally in Detroit on Sept 15, 2023. The union struck lucrative new deals with each of the Big Three automakers. The UAW now wants to use the momentum to unionize foreign automakers as well as Tesla. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

Monday

UAW members strike the General Motors Lansing Delta Assembly Plant in Lansing, Mich., on Sept. 29, 2023. The UAW clinched a deal with GM more than six weeks after the start of the auto strike. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

UAW president calls tentative deals with Ford and Stellantis big wins

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Sunday

UAW reaches a tentative deal with Chrysler, expands strike at General Motors

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Saturday

GM workers strike outside the General Motors Wentzville Assembly Plant in Wentzville, Missouri, on Sept. 15, 2023. Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images