Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.
Camila Domonoske square 2017
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Camila Domonoske

Gas prices are lower than when Russia invaded Ukraine

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Tax credits for electric vehicles create confusion and some frantic lobbying

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Encore: High demand for electric vehicles send lithium mines into overdrive

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Salt deposits float as the mountains are reflected in a lithium brine evaporation pool at Silver Peak lithium mine in Silver Peak, Nev. on Oct. 6, 2022. Bridget Bennett for NPR hide caption

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Bridget Bennett for NPR

High demand and prices for lithium send mines into overdrive

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Due to high inflation this year, NPR's Business desk shares cheaper dishes to substitute for Thanksgiving stables. Maansi Srivastava/NPR hide caption

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Maansi Srivastava/NPR

Inflation won't win Thanksgiving: Here's NPR's plan to help you save on a meal

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Twitter's new owner Elon Musk at the 2022 Met Gala in New York City in May. Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for The Met Museum/ hide caption

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Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for The Met Museum/

Elon Musk's backers cheer him on, even if they aren't sure what he's doing to Twitter

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Elon Musk says he's reinstating Trump's Twitter account

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The people most interested in electric vehicles can't afford to buy them

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Younger people are most interested in electric vehicles, but can't afford to buy them

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A CarMax lot holds hundreds of used cars and trucks in Gaithersburg, Md. on April 12. Used car prices have fallen from their recent peaks, but they remain extraordinarily high compared to just a few years ago. And other costs of car ownership are rising, too. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

It's not just buying a car — owning one is getting pricier, too

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Turbines from the Roth Rock wind farm spin on the spine of Backbone Mountain near Oakland, Md., on August 23. The International Energy Agency says renewable energy projects are getting a boost of investment from governments around the world. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

An influential energy group sees reason for climate optimism

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A gas pump displays current fuel prices, along with a sticker of President Biden, at a gas station in Arlington, Va., on March 16. The sticker says "I did that" — but the president wasn't responsible for rising prices then or falling prices now. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Whether gas prices are up or down, don't blame or thank the president

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Gas prices are falling, but does the White House deserve credit?

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An Austrian soldier guards the entrance of the OPEC headquarters in Vienna on October 4, on the eve of the 45th Meeting of the Joint Ministerial Monitoring Committee and the 33rd OPEC and non-OPEC Ministerial Meeting. OPEC and its allies agreed to reduce their production quotas at that meeting. Joe Klamar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Klamar/AFP via Getty Images