Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.
Camila Domonoske square 2017
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Camila Domonoske

A sign hangs above a Hertz rental car office on Aug. 4, 2020, in Chicago. The company said it's buying 100,000 Teslas in a bold move to diversify into electric vehicles. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Tesla's market value hits $1 trillion after Hertz agrees to buy 100,000 of its cars

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U.S. car makers are going electric and trying to change the world in the process

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Oil Topped $80 Dollars Per Barrel — The Most It's Cost In Almost 3 Years

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Vehicles sit in a nearly empty lot at a car dealership in Richmond, Calif., on July 1. The global semiconductor shortage has hobbled auto production worldwide, making it difficult to find a car to buy. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

So, You Are Shopping For A Car At A Terrible Time. Here's What To Keep In Mind

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In December 1955, a man posts a price for leaded gasoline at a station in Everett, Massachusetts. The United Nations said on Monday that the world is no longer using the toxic fuel, bringing an end to a century of damaging pollution. Anonymous/Associated Press hide caption

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Anonymous/Associated Press

The World Has Finally Stopped Using Leaded Gasoline. Algeria Used The Last Stockpile

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Out of order notes are left on gas pumps to warn motorists of outages Hollywood, Calif. on May 12, 2021, immediately after the Colonial Pipeline shutdown. Two of its lines were temporarily shut down ahead of Hurricane Ida this weekend. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

A driver exits the yard after filling up his gas tanker truck at Marathon Oil on May 20 in Salt Lake City. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

Tight Supply Of Truckers Leaves A Few Gas Stations Dry

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New Fuel Regulations Will Help The Transition To Electric Vehicles

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President Biden gets out of a Jeep Wrangler Rubicon 4xE after delivering remarks at the White House Thursday on electric vehicles and new fuel economy and emissions standards. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

There's A Big Push For Electric Cars, With The White House Teaming Up With Automakers

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The Delta Variant Forces U.S. Automakers To Revisit Mask Mandates

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Major automakers like Jaguar develop all-electric race cars to compete in Formula E. Here Mitch Evans, in a Jaguar, leads rivals during the ABB FIA Formula E Championship in New York City on July 11. Handout/Jaguar Racing via Getty Images hide caption

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Handout/Jaguar Racing via Getty Images

With A Whirr, Not A Roar, Auto Racing Drives Toward An Electric Future

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