Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.
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Camila Domonoske

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Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Reporter

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race. For NPR's Two-Way Blog/News Desk, she covered breaking news on all topics.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She was a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime" and co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

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Story Archive

Skeptics Doubt That An Ohio Company Can Bring Electric Truck To Market

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A man refuels at a gas station last month in Fayetteville, N.C., during a period when a hacking attack shut down a key pipeline. Oil companies confront an uncertain future, facing pressure to move toward greener energy. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Rayford/Getty Images

The energy industry was shaken by a trio of events this week that could help shape the future of oil and gas. Here, the sun sets behind two under-construction offshore oil platform rigs in Port Fourchon, La., in 2010. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The Week That Shook Big Oil

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Big Oil Companies Take Some Big Hits On Climate Change

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Pictured are pumps at an Exxon gas station in Charlotte, N.C. A tiny fund got two board members elected to the oil giant's board, delivering a historic defeat to ExxonMobil. Logan Cyrus/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Logan Cyrus/AFP via Getty Images

A Tiny Fund Has Scored A Historic Win Against ExxonMobil Over The Future Of Oil

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Ford unveils its new all-electric F-150 Lightning pickup Wednesday at Ford World Headquarters in Dearborn, Mich. The truck will come with a price tag that starts at just under $40,000. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

Pictured is the front grill of the new Ford F-150 Lightning unveiled on Wednesday in Dearborn, Mich. The electric version of Ford's bestselling pickup truck marks a major push to get buyers to switch to electric vehicles. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Why Ford Unveiling An Electric F-150 Is A Big Deal

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Ford Readies Electric F-150 For Official Public Debut

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The World Needs To Quit Oil To Avoid The Worst Of Climate Change, IEA Says

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Customers wait in line to fill up their tanks this week at a Costco gas station in Nashville, Tenn. It will take several days for the supply chain of fuel to return to normal even after Colonial Pipeline said it had brought its entire pipeline system back into operation. Brett Carlsen/Getty Images hide caption

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Tesla CEO Elon Musk delivers his opening monologue on "Saturday Night Live" last week in an image released by NBC. Musk tweeted on Wednesday that Tesla would no longer accept cryptocurrency Bitcoin for car purchases. Will Heath/NBC via AP hide caption

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Will Heath/NBC via AP

Cars line up Tuesday at a QuikTrip in Atlanta. Continued panic-buying is leading to shortages at gas stations across the Southeast after a hack attack shut down a critical pipeline. Megan Varner/Getty Images hide caption

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Megan Varner/Getty Images

Colonial Restarts Operations After Cyberattack As Panic-Buying Mounts In Southeast

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Hikes In Gas Prices Fueled In Part By Panic Buying

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The Ford company logo is displayed above the Chicago Assembly Plant on Feb. 3. Ford is allowing many workers to work remotely — not just during the pandemic, but as routine policy. But of course, plant workers can't sign in to work from home. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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A Remote Work Revolution Is Underway — But Not For Everyone

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Big Oil Is Seeing Big Earnings Again

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