Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.
Camila Domonoske square 2017
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Camila Domonoske

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Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Correspondent

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She covers the automotive supply chain, reporting from the salt piles of an active lithium mine and the floor of a vehicle assembly plant. She reports on what cars mean to the daily lives of the American public — whether they're buying cars, maintaining cars or walking and biking on streets dominated by cars. And she is closely tracking the automotive industry's transformative shift toward zero-emission vehicles.

She monitors the gyrations of global energy markets, explaining why price movements are happening and what it means for the world. She tracks the profits and investments of some of the world's largest energy producers. As global urgency around climate change mounts, she has reported on how companies are — and are not — responding to calls for a rapid energy transition. She has reported on why a country that is remarkably vulnerable to climate change would embrace oil production, and why investors, for reasons unrelated to climate change, have pushed companies to curb their output.

Before she joined the business desk, Domonoske was a general assignment reporter and a web producer for NPR. She has covered hurricanes and elections, walruses and circuses. She has written about language, race, gender and history. In a career highlight, she helped NPR win a pie-eating contest in the summer of 2018.

Domonoske graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina, where she majored in English, with a focus on modern poetry.

Story Archive

Tuesday

With his son in one arm, Tesla CEO Elon Musk waves while visiting the Tesla Gigafactory in Germany in March. Ebrahim Noroozi/AP hide caption

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Ebrahim Noroozi/AP

Friday

Monday

What good is an EV if you can't charge it? Here's the plan to build more chargers

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Tuesday

The economic impact of the Baltimore bridge collapse

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Monday

Sea levels in Guyana are rising several times faster than the global average. High tides sometimes spill over the seawall that is meant to protect the coastline. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

The two sides of Guyana: a green champion and an oil producer

For Guyana the potential wealth from oil development was irresistible — even as the country faces rising seas. Today on the show, host Emily Kwong talks to reporter Camila Domonoske about her 2021 trip to Guyana and how the country is grappling with its role as a victim of climate change while it moves forward with drilling more oil. (encore)

The two sides of Guyana: a green champion and an oil producer

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Saturday

Car imports could slow with Port of Baltimore closures

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Friday

Thursday

Cars exit from the Baltimore Port after the cargo ship Dali ran into and collapsed the Francis Scott Key Bridge in Baltimore, Md., on Tuesday. Two people were pulled alive from the water, two bodies were recovered and four people were presumed dead. The men were working on the bridge at the time of the collision at 1:30 a.m. Kena Betancur/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/Getty Images

Tuesday

Cars are visible in a general view from the Baltimore Port after the cargo ship Dali ran into and collapsed the Francis Scott Key Bridge in Baltimore, Md., on Tuesday. The accident has temporarily closed the Port of Baltimore, which handles more vehicles per year than any other U.S. port. Kena Betancur/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/Getty Images

Sunday

The EPA's new rules point to EVs being the future — but consumers have their doubts

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Thursday

New vehicle emission rules are meant to quicken the change to electric vehicles

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Wednesday

Morning traffic fills the SR2 freeway in Los Angeles, California. The EPA released new rules for vehicle emissions that are expected to cut tailpipe pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, which are fueling climate change. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

In a boost for EVs, EPA finalizes strict new limits on tailpipe emissions

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Thursday

Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

You asked, we answered: Your questions about electric vehicles

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Friday

It's "Vehicle Safety Recalls Week," an initiative by federal regulators to encourage drivers to check if their car has been recalled during the two days a year when clocks in the U.S. change. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

It's time to move your clocks forward — and to check if your car is being recalled

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Saturday

How well do EVs handle cold weather?

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Friday

Tesla CEO Elon Musk speaks at a conference in Paris on June 16, 2023. Musk's record compensation package as Tesla CEO was recently rejected by a court as excessive, in a decision that pivoted in part on how much sway Musk has over his company. Alain Jocard/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alain Jocard/AFP via Getty Images

Elon Musk is synonymous with Tesla. Is that good or bad for shareholders?

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Wednesday

Electric F-150 Lightning pickup trucks travel down the production line at Ford's Rouge Electric Vehicle Center in Dearborn, Michigan on September 8, 2022. Ford has cut two shifts at the plant as it reduces production of the Lightning. But this week Ford CEO Jim Farley told investors "the journey on EVs is inevitable, in our eyes." Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

Wednesday

The journey toward electric vehicles has hit a rough patch. Sales are cooling off

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Tuesday

Toyota issues do-not-drive order for some older cars over defective airbags

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Thursday

Cruise autonomous vehicles sit parked in a lot in June 2023 in San Francisco, Calif. The company's fleet of robotaxis have not been operating for the past few months, after the company's response to a crash in October raised concerns with regulators. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Thursday

Oil production companies in the U.S. keep consolidating

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Saturday

An aerial view of Consumer Reports' testing track in Connecticut. Consumer Reports hide caption

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Consumer Reports

As the auto industry pivots to EVs, product tester Consumer Reports learns to adjust

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Thursday

Thursday

A $7,500 tax credit for electric vehicles has seen substantial changes in 2024. It should be easier to get because it's now available as an instant rebate at dealerships, but fewer models qualify. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The $7,500 tax credit for electric cars has some big changes in 2024. What to know

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