Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.
Camila Domonoske square 2017
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Camila Domonoske

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Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Reporter

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race. For NPR's Two-Way Blog/News Desk, she covered breaking news on all topics.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She was a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime" and co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

Story Archive

A sign displays fuel prices at a gas station in Arlington, Va., on March 16. President Biden announced on Thursday the country's largest-ever release from its Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

A worker assembles Volkswagen electric cars at the company's plant in Zwickau, Germany on Jan. 27. Automakers like Volkswagen are racing to secure enough metals to power the batteries needed to make electric vehicles. Jens Schlueter/Getty Images hide caption

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Jens Schlueter/Getty Images

How a handful of metals could determine the future of the electric car industry

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Automakers partner with mines as electric cars rely on raw materials for batteries

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Gas prices reach over $5 a gallon at a station in Los Angeles on Friday. Oil prices continue to surge after Russia's invasion of Ukraine, with some analysts describing market conditions as verging on "panic." Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Big oil companies cut business ties with Russia

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Gas prices are seen at a gas station in Vernon Hills, Ill., on June 11, 2021. Crude prices continued to gain on Thursday even after the U.S. and 30 other countries announced a coordinated release of oil from their reserves. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

Biden sanctions spare Russia's energy sector. What that means for OPEC talks

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A sign shows gas prices at a Shell station in San Francisco on Feb. 23. Gas prices could rise further as crude prices surge following Russia's invasion of Ukraine. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Ukraine crisis drives up global energy prices

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Gasoline prices are displayed at a Chevron gas station in downtown Los Angeles on Feb. 18. Crude oil prices are surging toward $100 a barrel, raising the prospect of even higher gasoline prices. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

How China dominates the electric vehicle supply chain

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