Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.
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Camila Domonoske

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Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Reporter

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race. For NPR's Two-Way Blog/News Desk, she covered breaking news on all topics.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She was a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime" and co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

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Story Archive

A worker fixes a water pipe in Galveston, Texas, on Feb. 19. The power is back on in much of the state, but the Lone Star State now faces the hefty cost of emerging from its devastating storms. Thomas Shea/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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The Power Is Back On In Texas. Now Comes The Recovery, And It Won't Be Cheap

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Texas Begin To See Financial Fallout Of Winter Storm

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What Happened In Texas And Who Is To Blame?

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Snow covers the ground in Waco, Texas, on Feb. 17. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has blamed renewable energy sources for the blackouts that have hit the state. In fact, they were caused by a systemwide failure across all energy sources. Matthew Busch/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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No, The Blackouts In Texas Weren't Caused By Renewables. Here's What Really Happened

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Jerry Jones, owner of the Dallas Cowboys, looks on prior to a game against the Pittsburgh Steelers at AT&T Stadium on Nov. 8, 2020, in Arlington, Texas. An oil company in which he is the majority shareholder said it had hit the "jackpot" as natural gas prices surged during the winter storms. Ronald Martinez/Getty Images hide caption

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What Really Caused The Texas Power Shortage?

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Deep Freeze In Texas Pushes Up Crude Oil, Gasoline Prices

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Shortage Of Computer Chips Forces Automakers To Curtail Production

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Tesla CEO Elon Musk speaks during the unveiling of the new Tesla Model Y in Hawthorne, Calif., on March 14, 2019. Tesla announced on Monday it would invest $1.5 billion in cryptocurrency Bitcoin. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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It Doesn't Get More Buzzy Than This: Tesla Is Investing $1.5 Billion In Bitcoin

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Tesla Embraces Bitcoin With $1.5 Billion Investment

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Crude Prices Are Recovering, But Oil Companies Are Far From A Return To Normal

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Biden Administration Wants Electric Vehicles To Replace Gas Guzzlers

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General Motors Sets All-Electric Target For Vehicles By 2035

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Pete Buttigieg speaks on Dec. 16 after he was nominated to be transportation secretary by then-President-elect Joe Biden. Buttigieg faced a largely friendly reception at his Senate confirmation hearing on Thursday. Kevin Lamarque-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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