Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.
Camila Domonoske square 2017
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Camila Domonoske

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Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Reporter

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race. For NPR's Two-Way Blog/News Desk, she covered breaking news on all topics.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She was a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime" and co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

Story Archive

The Lucid Air takes the stage at the 2021 LA Autoshow on November 17, 2021. The luxury electric sedan won the 2022 Motortrend Car of the Year award this month. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Every auto startup wants to be the next Tesla. Why these 2 may have a real shot

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2 little-known automotive startups are leading the race to become the next Tesla

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A customer prepares to pump gas into her car at a Shell station on Wednesday in San Rafael, Calif. A surge in gas prices this year is leaving the Biden administration looking for options to do something about it. One that's getting recent attention is tapping the country's emergency oil stockpile. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Motorists fill up their vehicles at a Shell station on July 22 in Denver. Phasing out the sale of gas-powered cars once seemed laughable. It's now inching closer to reality. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Giving up gas-powered cars was a fringe idea. It's now on its way to reality

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Sea levels in Guyana are rising several times faster than the global average. High tides sometimes spill over the seawall that is meant to protect the coastline. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Two Sides Of Guyana: A Green Champion And An Oil Producer

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The age of gas cars could be ending

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High gas prices are posted at a gas station in Beverly Hills, Calif., on Nov. 7. Gas prices are surging across the country yet there's effectively little the Biden administration can do. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Gasoline prices are surging. Can Biden actually do something about it?

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A Rivian electric truck is displayed near the Nasdaq MarketSite building in Times Square in New York City on Nov. 10. Rivian, an electric-truck maker backed by Amazon and Ford, made its debut on Nasdaq in one of the biggest initial public offerings in U.S. history. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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The electric automaker Rivian soared in its stock debut. Why there's so much buzz

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A seawall stretches for hundreds of miles along the coast of Guyana, in northern South America. It protects the low-lying coastal lands where the majority of Guyana's population lives. The region is acutely threatened by rising sea levels, as well as other symptoms of climate change, yet Guyana is embracing the oil industry. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Guyana is a poor country that was a green champion. Then Exxon discovered oil

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Guyana, facing an existential threat from climate change, welcomes the oil industry

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A sign hangs above a Hertz rental car office on Aug. 4, 2020, in Chicago. The company said it's buying 100,000 Teslas in a bold move to diversify into electric vehicles. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Tesla's market value hits $1 trillion after Hertz agrees to buy 100,000 of its cars

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U.S. car makers are going electric and trying to change the world in the process

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Oil Topped $80 Dollars Per Barrel — The Most It's Cost In Almost 3 Years

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Vehicles sit in a nearly empty lot at a car dealership in Richmond, Calif., on July 1. The global semiconductor shortage has hobbled auto production worldwide, making it difficult to find a car to buy. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

So, You Are Shopping For A Car At A Terrible Time. Here's What To Keep In Mind

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