Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.
Camila Domonoske square 2017
Stories By

Camila Domonoske

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Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Reporter

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race. For NPR's Two-Way Blog/News Desk, she covered breaking news on all topics.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She was a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime" and co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

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Story Archive

Delta And BP Pledge To Go Carbon-Neutral. How? That's The Question

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Electric vans charge at a warehouse of the German postal and logistics service Deutsche Post near Frankfurt in July 2018. Fleet vehicles are increasingly going electric in Europe and China, and some analysts say American fleets will be following suit. Yann Schreiber/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yann Schreiber/AFP via Getty Images

From Delivery Trucks To Scooter-Moving Vans, Fleets Are Going Electric

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In the early 2000s, General Motors went all-in on the massive Hummers while abandoning its electric vehicle program. Tim Boyle/Getty Images hide caption

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The Hummer Is Coming Back — As An Electric Vehicle

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A helicopter flies in Brazil in 2014. Some helicopter trips — like personal or private helicopter rides — are more likely than others to end in a fatal accident. Warren Little/Getty Images hide caption

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Tesla CEO Elon Musk speaks during the unveiling of the Tesla Model Y in Hawthorne, Calif., on March 14, 2019. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Electric Burn: Those Who Bet Against Elon Musk And Tesla Are Paying A Big Price

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The Danish company Maersk has been shipping goods around the world since the age of steamships. Now it wants to usher in a new era, with carbon neutral transport. David Hecker/Getty Images hide caption

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David Hecker/Getty Images

Giant Shipper Bets Big On Ending Its Carbon Emissions. Will It Pay Off?

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Virgin Galactic's space tourism rocket plane SpaceShipTwo returns after a test flight in California on Dec. 13, 2018. Billionaire Richard Branson is partnering with a group of investors to take his space tourism company public. Gene Blevins/Reuters hide caption

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Gene Blevins/Reuters

Lee Iaccoca, Superstar CEO Of Chrysler, Dies At 94

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Lee Iacocca, pictured in February 1989, died Tuesday at the age of 94. Under his leadership he brought Chrysler back from the brink of bankruptcy. He is also considered the father of the Mustang, which he helped develop during his stint at Ford. Mario Cabrera/AP hide caption

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Mario Cabrera/AP

A Saudi worker adjusts flags of participating countries before a meeting of energy ministers from OPEC and its allies in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, on May 19. OPEC+ countries met again in Vienna on Monday and Tuesday and agreed to formalize their relationship in a "Charter of Cooperation." Amr Nabil/AP hide caption

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Amr Nabil/AP

Journalists interview oil ministers on the sidelines of the 176th meeting of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries conference on Monday in Vienna. Joe Klamar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Klamar/AFP/Getty Images