Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.
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Camila Domonoske

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Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Reporter

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race. For NPR's Two-Way Blog/News Desk, she covered breaking news on all topics.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She was a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime" and co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

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Story Archive

A worker is seen inside the production chain at Renesas Electronics, a semiconductor manufacturer, in Beijing on May 14, 2020. A global computer chip shortage is affecting automakers. Nicolas Asfouri/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolas Asfouri/AFP via Getty Images

Auto Production Disrupted By Chip Shortages: A Dream Car May Be Hard To Find

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The SPAC Is Back!

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A Trump flag flies over the grounds of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday after a mob stormed the building, breaking windows and clashing with police officers. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Hurricane Laura sends large waves crashing on a beach in Cameron, La., on Aug. 26 as an offshore oil rig appears in the distance. The most active hurricane season on record was just one of many challenges facing the oil industry this year — aside from the attention-grabbing crisis of the pandemic. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

It Wasn't Just The Pandemic: Oil's Terrible, No Good, Very Bad Year

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This Year's Car Sales Exceeded Expectation Despite The Pandemic

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The SPAC, or special purpose acquisition company, has become the hottest trend on Wall Street this year. It allows a company to go public without all the paperwork of a traditional initial public offering. Above, the Charging Bull statue in New York City's Financial District. Anadolu Agency/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The Spectacular Rise Of SPACs: The Backwards IPO That's Taking Over Wall Street

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SPACs: The Backwards IPO That's Taking Over Wall Street

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Air conditioners on display in Baghdad. Congress' coronavirus relief package will also reduce the use of hydrofluorocarbons, putting the U.S. in line with an international agreement to fight climate change. Khalid Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Khalid Mohammed/AP

Automakers are racing to be the first to bring an electric pickup to market — including, clockwise from top left, Rivian's sporty offering, Tesla's futuristic Cybertruck, General Motors' Hummer EV and Lordstown's work-focused Endurance. Courtesy of Rivian, Tesla, Lordstown Motors and General Motors hide caption

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Courtesy of Rivian, Tesla, Lordstown Motors and General Motors

All The Oomph, Minus The Vroom? Electric Pickups Take Aim At American Market

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Automakers Race To Bring Electric Pickup Trucks To Market

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Uber Sells Its Autonomous Vehicle Research Division

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An Uber sticker is seen on a car at the start of a protest by ride share drivers on Aug. 20, in Los Angeles. Uber said it will sell its self-driving research unit to startup Aurora. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman, Saudi Arabia's minister of energy, chairs a virtual Group of 20 ministers meeting in April. The Saudi-led OPEC cartel decided to boost production modestly amid considerable uncertainty about the global economy. Saudi Energy Ministry via AP hide caption

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Saudi Energy Ministry via AP

An Exxon station in Hicksville, N.Y., in March. Exxon Mobil Corp. announced up to $20 billion in write-downs of natural gas assets, the biggest such action ever by the company. Bruce Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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Exxon Writes Off Record Amount From Value of Assets Amid Energy Market Downturn

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