Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.
Camila Domonoske square 2017
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Camila Domonoske

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Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Reporter

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race. For NPR's Two-Way Blog/News Desk, she covered breaking news on all topics.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She was a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime" and co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

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Story Archive

A poster for Endurance is seen in the office of Lordstown Motors CEO Steve Burns. Carter Eugene Adams for NPR hide caption

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Carter Eugene Adams for NPR

An Electric Pickup Truck Brings New Energy To Lordstown, Ohio

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Protesters march in New York City on June 19th, as ongoing demonstrations against police brutality and racism continued through Juneteenth, the holiday that marks the end of slavery in the U.S. Donations to bail funds spiked as protests spread across the country earlier this month, surprising many nonprofits that suddenly saw their resources swell. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Protest Arrests Led To Surge Of Bail Fund Donations: Impact Could Be Long Lasting

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More than half of New York City's households don't have access to a car. Across the country, people without vehicles are weighing their options — or lack thereof — as the pandemic adds a new risk to public transit. Gabby Jones/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Gabby Jones/Bloomberg via Getty Images

CDC Now Recommends Driving Alone. But What If You Don't Have A Car?

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Protesters hold up signs during a caravan protest for justice in San Francisco on Thursday. Chloe Jackman Photography hide caption

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Chloe Jackman Photography

Caravan For Justice: Cars Offer Socially Distanced Protesting During Pandemic

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Gary Jones, former president of the United Auto Workers, has admitted he conspired to embezzle more than $1 million out of dues paid by union members. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

General Electric has been making lightbulbs for more than a century but is now selling its lighting business. Above, a lightbulb is displayed at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C., in 2015. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

GE No Longer Bringing Good Things To 'Light'

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Avery Hoppa with her 3-year-old daughter Zelda. Hoppa says she's "incredibly grateful" that she and her husband still have jobs. But she says it "feels weird to be a consumer right now" as many are struggling financially. Avery Hoppa hide caption

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Avery Hoppa

The city of Wuhan, where the coronavirus first began to spread, is pictured on May 14. Many Chinese cities have seen rush hour traffic return to pre-pandemic levels — or worse — after reopening, according to traffic data company TomTom. Cities around the world are trying to figure out how to avoid disastrous gridlock as residents resume travel while avoiding public transit. Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images

As Lockdown Orders Lift, Can Cities Prevent A Traffic Catastrophe?

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Keri Belcher, who has worked in the oil and gas industry, says she's considering switching careers — even if it means less time outdoors, which is what attracted her to geology in the first place. Peter Flaig hide caption

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Peter Flaig

Cities Must Rethink Public Transportation As States Reopen Amid Pandemic

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A customer looks at trucks Friday at a Toyota dealership in El Monte, Calif. Car sales have been recovering for several weeks despite the continuing coronavirus outbreak. Mark J. Terrill/AP hide caption

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Mark J. Terrill/AP

7-Year No-Interest Loans: What It Takes To Sell Cars In A Pandemic

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If you haven't gotten your pandemic relief payment yet and would like to receive it by direct deposit, make sure the IRS has your bank account information before noon Wednesday. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Vehicles are seen parked at the Tesla car plant in Fremont, Calif., on Monday. The parking lot was nearly full; Tesla resumed production in defiance of an order from county health authorities. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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Ben Margot/AP

Elon Musk Reopens California Tesla Plant, Defying Local Health Officials (Again)

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