Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.
Camila Domonoske square 2017
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Camila Domonoske

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Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Reporter

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race. For NPR's Two-Way Blog/News Desk, she covered breaking news on all topics.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She was a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime" and co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

Story Archive

Traffic passes through Tonopah, Nev. on Oct. 6, 2022. Bridget Bennett for NPR hide caption

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Bridget Bennett for NPR

There's a lithium mining boom, but it's not a jobs bonanza

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Gas prices are lower than when Russia invaded Ukraine

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Tax credits for electric vehicles create confusion and some frantic lobbying

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Encore: High demand for electric vehicles send lithium mines into overdrive

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Salt deposits float as the mountains are reflected in a lithium brine evaporation pool at Silver Peak lithium mine in Silver Peak, Nev. on Oct. 6, 2022. Bridget Bennett for NPR hide caption

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Bridget Bennett for NPR

High demand and prices for lithium send mines into overdrive

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Due to high inflation this year, NPR's Business desk shares cheaper dishes to substitute for Thanksgiving stables. Maansi Srivastava/NPR hide caption

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Inflation won't win Thanksgiving: Here's NPR's plan to help you save on a meal

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Twitter's new owner Elon Musk at the 2022 Met Gala in New York City in May. Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for The Met Museum/ hide caption

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Elon Musk's backers cheer him on, even if they aren't sure what he's doing to Twitter

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Elon Musk says he's reinstating Trump's Twitter account

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The people most interested in electric vehicles can't afford to buy them

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Younger people are most interested in electric vehicles, but can't afford to buy them

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A CarMax lot holds hundreds of used cars and trucks in Gaithersburg, Md. on April 12. Used car prices have fallen from their recent peaks, but they remain extraordinarily high compared to just a few years ago. And other costs of car ownership are rising, too. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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It's not just buying a car — owning one is getting pricier, too

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Turbines from the Roth Rock wind farm spin on the spine of Backbone Mountain near Oakland, Md., on August 23. The International Energy Agency says renewable energy projects are getting a boost of investment from governments around the world. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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An influential energy group sees reason for climate optimism

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A gas pump displays current fuel prices, along with a sticker of President Biden, at a gas station in Arlington, Va., on March 16. The sticker says "I did that" — but the president wasn't responsible for rising prices then or falling prices now. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Whether gas prices are up or down, don't blame or thank the president

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